...as well as she did / had done

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
The fact that Mary was able to draw as well as she did / had done proves her full recovery.

Dear all,

The above is created by me. Could you tell me which one works for you? and why? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thanks, coolieinblue. But could you have a look at the following sentence taken from the NYT.

    “The fact that Germany was able to grow as well as it did is testament to the strength of their exports,” Mr. Moëc said.

    Thanks again. :)
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I disagree with Coolie, and stand by the NYT's use of the simple past. Mary was able to draw something. This happened at a definite time in the past.
    I'm not sure why you're considering the past perfect; perhaps you could explain your reasoning?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think LQZ's options have two different meanings.

    (1) (simple past) On the occasion in question, Mary was able to draw well. That fact proved she had recovered*.

    (2) (past perfect) On the occasion in question, Mary was able to draw as well as she had been able to before her illness. That fact proved she had recovered.

    (* I'd say this rather than proved her recovery)



    .
     
    I didn't think your construction was incorrect.

    My sentence focused on just what the speaker saw at the moment.
    I chose 'had done' because it sounds distancing her past practice, which the listner might not have known.

    In contrast, your abstract suggests that the author understood the readers were aware that Germany had kept growing before and he saw, after observation for some time period, its ability resumed.

    hope this can help.
     
    I think LQZ's options have two different meanings.

    (2) (past perfect) On the occasion in question, Mary was able to draw as well as she had been able to before her illness. That fact proved she had recovered.

    (* I'd say this rather than proved her recovery)


    .
    Thank you, Loob

    You are saying almost the same thing as me, but more concisely.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    1 The fact that Mary was able to draw as well as she had been proves her full recovery.
    2“The fact that Germany was able to grow as well as it had been is testament to the strength of their exports,” Mr. Moëc said.

    I am still confused. To me, there is comparision in sentence 1 and 2, and what is being compared is her (its) capability in the past and before the past. That is why I think past perfect should be used, especially in the report at the NYT. :(

    Could you explain further? Thanks.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, let's have a closer look at the German growth sentence as written in the New York Times: The fact that Germany was able to grow as well as it did is testament to the strength of their exports.

    The key point is that there is no comparison drawn here between one time period and another:
    Germany grew by 0.2%.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow by 0.2% is testament to its strength.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow by as much as 0.2% is testament to its strength.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow by as much as the 0.2% which it did grow by is testament to its strength.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow as well as it did [grow] is testament to its strength.

    Hope that helps:)
     
    Last edited:

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    The fact that Germany was able to grow by 0.2% is testament to its strength.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow by as much as 0.2% is testament to its strength.

    The fact that Germany was able to grow by as much as the 0.2% which it did grow by is testament to its strength.
    The fact that Germany was able to grow as well as it did [grow] is testament to its strength.
    Loob, it does help. Thanks.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top