As well as

Hani_D

Banned
Arabic
Hello,

This phrase has always given me a headache. I would like to know what are exactly the appropriate and inappropriate usages amongst the following:

I like this thing as well as that thing.
I do this deed as well as that deed.
I am "adjective," as well as "adjective."
This thing is "adjective," as well as that thing.
This thing does "something," as well as that thing.

Thank you,
 
  • Mariculi

    Senior Member
    Spain, spanish
    I think they're all correct, but the meaning changes. "As well as" could mean "also".

    As well (as) is also used for comparison:

    I can't write as well as you (can).

    I'm Spanish, let's wait for a native...
     

    Hani_D

    Banned
    Arabic
    Ok, let's say:

    I play classical; as well as jazz. (he's great at classical but he sucks at jazz)

    What do you think here?
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello,

    This phrase has always given me a headache. I would like to know what are exactly the appropriate and inappropriate usages amongst the following:

    I like this thing as well as that thing.:tick:
    I do this deed as well as that deed.:tick:
    I am "adjective," as well as "adjective."
    This thing is "adjective," as well as that thing.
    This thing does "something," as well as that thing.:tick:

    Thank you,

    I am strong (adjective) as well as gentle (adjective). It isn't great, but not terrible.

    This book is heavy (adjective) as well as a biography (thing). Same here, but I admit I am stretching the point.;)
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Well I am not convinced with these threads. I believe that the only correct meaning for this phrase is "as well as: to an equal degree or extent."

    I would be glad if someone brought script from a dictionary (or any book) that mentions other meanings for this phrase.

    The first issue that should be addressed is that "as well as" does not necessarily mean the same thing in all of your examples.

    "As well as" can mean either "with the same quality/skill/effectiveness" or "in addition to."

    He speaks English as well as Spanish might be read as meaning that he speaks both languages equally well.
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Do you have it, my jingle bells friend?

    Biblio's answer is correct. Those meanings might just take some time to sink in. I bet they did give you a headache. :(
     

    camaysar

    Senior Member
    usa
    usa, english
    Ok, let's say:

    I play classical; as well as jazz. (he's great at classical but he sucks at jazz)

    Hi,

    A few comments about this... you don't want a ";" after "classical". If, however, you use a comma after "classical" (I play classical, as well as jazz.), the meaning will be that you play both classical and jazz. There is no reference to how well or poorly you play either.

    If you don't use any punctuation after "classical" (I play classical as well as jazz.), the meaning will be that you play classical with the same ability you play jazz.

    I'm not saying you definitely need a comma to give the first meaning, but if you want to definitely, unequivicably have the first meaning, you would use a comma. Without a comma, you are in danger of having it misinterpreted. I would write rather, "I play classical as well as I play jazz" to be perfectly clear.
     
    Top