as/when/while I was getting out of the hot tub.

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shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Dear all,


I made it up.
"I twisted my ankle getting out of the hot tub."

I'd like to change the above sentence into a sentence with an adverbial clause of time:
#1. I twisted my ankle as I was getting out of the hot tub.
#2. I twisted my ankle when I was getting out of the hot tub.
#3. I twisted my ankle while I was getting out of the hot tub.

Which conjunction is most appropriate to mean the same thing as the original sentence?
My choice is #1.
Am I right?


Thank you for your help.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    None of them means exactly the same as the original. That tells us that it was the getting out that caused the twisted ankle. The other sentences tell us when you twisted it, not what caused the injury. All of them are acceptable in this context.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    None of them means exactly the same as the original. That tells us that it was the getting out that caused the twisted ankle. The other sentences tell us when you twisted it, not what caused the injury. All of them are acceptable in this context.

    Thank you very much, loverofenglish and Andygc.


    I've found 'as' in my grammar book(English grammar in use).

    It says:
    You can say that something happened as you were doing something else(=in the middle of doing something else):
    Jill slipped as she was getting off the bus.
    The thief was seen as he was climbing over the wall.

    I thought they were the same as "Jill slipped getting off the bus." and "the thief was seen climbing over the wall." respectively.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I have difficulty visualizing how you could twist your ankle while getting out of the hot tub, without getting out of the hot tub being partly to blame for twisting your ankle. :) If we change the event, we find there need be no causal relationship:

    I heard the phone ring getting out of the hot tub. :(

    But now I want a comma in that, precisely because there is no connexion, whereas you can twist your ankle without a comma. And we're more likely to say it the other way round:

    I heard the phone ring, getting out of the hot tub. :(
    Getting out of the hot tub, I heard the phone ring.

    (I'm trying to avoid versions that raise the question "why was there a phone in the hot tub?") And now we see there is a difference. You can hurt yourself doing something – or see someone doing something – these are linked causally. 'Jill slipped getting off the bus' is similar: it's not merely simultaneous, the way it is in :( 'Jill sneezed getting off the bus'.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I have difficulty visualizing how you could twist your ankle while getting out of the hot tub, without getting out of the hot tub being partly to blame for twisting your ankle. :) If we change the event, we find there need be no causal relationship:

    I heard the phone ring getting out of the hot tub. :(

    But now I want a comma in that, precisely because there is no connexion, whereas you can twist your ankle without a comma. And we're more likely to say it the other way round:

    I heard the phone ring, getting out of the hot tub. :(
    Getting out of the hot tub, I heard the phone ring.

    (I'm trying to avoid versions that raise the question "why was there a phone in the hot tub?") And now we see there is a difference. You can hurt yourself doing something – or see someone doing something – these are linked causally. 'Jill slipped getting off the bus' is similar: it's not merely simultaneous, the way it is in :( 'Jill sneezed getting off the bus'.

    Thank you very much, entangledbank and all of you. :)

    Maybe I need pretty much time to understand what you explained. :eek:
     
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