as with/for/regards

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wounding whether as with, as for and as regards can be used interchangeably. I saw a sentence on wikipedia:

As with other types of language variation, there tends to be a spectrum of registers rather than a discrete set of obviously distinct varieties – numerous registers could be identified, with no clear boundaries between them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Register_(sociolinguistics)

Since this website is so well-known, I believe the use of "as with" should be formal and standard.

Would you give me some advice? Thank you.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    These three phrases are all possible but do not have the same meaning.

    As with compares case A with case B and says they are similar. E.g. As with other types of language variation (= case A), there tends to be (in case B which I am discussing now) a spectrum of registers ...

    As for and as regards do not compare two similar cases. They introduce a new case, usually contrasting it with several previous ones. E.g. Britain and France have always had large navies. As for Switzerland, it has no sea-coast and therefore no sea-going ships.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    These three phrases are all possible but do not have the same meaning.

    As with compares case A with case B and says they are similar. E.g. As with other types of language variation (= case A), there tends to be (in case B which I am discussing now) a spectrum of registers ...

    As for and as regards do not compare two similar cases. They introduce a new case, usually contrasting it with several previous ones. E.g. Britain and France have always had large navies. As for Switzerland, it has no sea-coast and therefore no sea-going ships.
    Thank you very much.
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    As with compares case A with case B and says they are similar. E.g. As with other types of language variation (= case A), there tends to be (in case B which I am discussing now) a spectrum of registers
    When we use "as with" to compare two cases, do the two cases necessarily have to be similar to each other rather than different?

    Many thanks!
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Oh, yes. That's the meaning of "as".

    If you want to compare things that are different you need something like: "In contrast to A, we find B..." or "Whereas A does this, B does that..." or "Unlike A, case B is different..."
     
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