As & With

ILOVEZNZ

Member
China,Mandarin
There are two sentences lies here:
1) As the days went on,the weather got worse.
2)With all his followers dead,the captain was taken by his enemy.

In the first sentence,why we can't use "with" to instead of "As"?In the second sentence,why we can't use "As" to instead of "With"?This problem has troubled me nearly a week...:confused:
 
  • Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "As" and "with" are not interchangable. They do not mean the same thing.


    Consider these sentences:
    The captain was taken with the enemy.
    This means that both the captain and the enemy were taken together. There are two people in this sentence.

    The captain was taken as the enemy.
    This means the captain was the enemy. There is one person in this sentence.
     

    ILOVEZNZ

    Member
    China,Mandarin
    Nick said:
    "As" and "with" are not interchangable. They do not mean the same thing.




    Consider these sentences:
    The captain was taken with the enemy.

    This means that both the captain and the enemy were taken together. There are two people in this sentence.

    The captain was taken as the enemy.
    This means the captain was the enemy. There is one person in this sentence.

    Frist of all,thanks for your reply!To the first sentence,can we say "The weather got worse with the days went on."?I think it also understandable.So,I can either "as" or "with" here?
    I think both "as" and "with" can be used as conjunction,as a result,why can't we use "as" to take place of "with" in the second sentence?In that case,it can mean "When all his followers dead,the captain was taken by his enemy."
    I'm puzzled..:confused:
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    Frist of all,thanks for your reply!To the first sentence,can we say "The weather got worse with the days went on."?I think it also understandable.So,I can either "as" or "with" here?
    No, you cannot use "with" in that sentence. First of all, "with" is not conjunction. The word "with" is a preposition.

    You could replace the word "as" with another conjunction and still have a grammatically correct sentence. For example:
    The weather got worse as the days went on.
    The weather got worse because the days went on.
    The weather got worse while the days went on.
    The weather got worse and the days went on.
    The weather got worse but the days went on.
    However, these sentences all have different meanings!
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    I think both "as" and "with" can be used as conjunction,as a result,why can't we use "as" to take place of "with" in the second sentence?
    Because 1) "with" is not a conjunction and 2) the sentences would have different meanings.

    "To fly" and "to eat" are both verbs, but we cannot use them interchangeably because they mean different things.
     

    ILOVEZNZ

    Member
    China,Mandarin
    Thanks Nick,but you haven't got what I was saying.I think it's my fault that I haven't express it clearly enough.....Yeah,they do have a different meaning,but sometimes they can mean the same.I've look it up in the dictionary and it says "because of sth. and as it happens".Here are two examples:

    a)The shadows lengthened with the approach of sunset.
    b)As she grew older she gained in confidence.

    I think the two words in both sentences can mean accompany with something's happenning.So,why can't I say "With the days went on,the weather got worse."??Can you explain at this point?Waiting for your reply!Thanks again!

    yours sincerely
    sunny
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    a)The shadows lengthened
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    with the approach of sunset.
    b)
    As she grew older she gained in confidence.

    You need to change the verb tense if you want to replace "with" with "as".
    The shadows lengthened with the approach of sunset.
    The shadows lengthened
    as the sunset approached.

    She gained confidence
    as she grew older.
    She gained confidence
    with age.
    For "as", you can combine the past tense + as + past tense. This does not work for "with", you need to use the present tense or the -ing form of the verb.
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    So,why can't I say "
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    With the days went on,the weather got worse."??Can you explain at this point?Waiting for your reply!Thanks again!

    If you want to use with in this sentence, you must change the tense of the verb.
    The weather got worse as the days passed.
    The weather got worse with the passing of the days.

    Sorry, I can't give a good explanation -- you just need to memorize which prepositions to use where, I guess. These words have different meanings. They also have many meanings. Maybe one of their meanings is the same, but usually they do not mean the same thing.
     
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