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  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    azz said:
    "It gave him as intense pleasure as before."

    Is this sentence grammatical?

    Hola Azz,

    It does appear to be correct, although it sounds a little awkward.
    Try to think of it this way:

    It gave him a pleasure as intense as before.

    Hope this helps,
    Cuchuflete
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thanks Cuchuflete,
    Could one use:

    It gave him pleasure as intense as before.
    It gave him as intense a pleasure as before.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    azz said:
    Thanks Cuchuflete,
    Could one use:

    It gave him pleasure as intense as before.
    It gave him as intense a pleasure as before.
    Hi azz;

    I like the first sentence better than the second....
    First of all the second isn't wrong...it is just confusing...with using "as" , azz, :D that many times it gets people lost...
    let me think about this for a bit..an alternatave...
    will get back to you...
    I would change the sentence to:
    "It gave him intense pleasure as before."..or..
    "It gave him as intense a pleasure, the same as before." When adding some words it is not "AS" confusing.

    te gato;)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    azz said:
    Thanks Cuchuflete,
    Could one use:

    It gave him pleasure as intense as before.
    It gave him as intense a pleasure as before.


    I think the first sentence you posted is the best one.

    "It gave him as intense pleasure as before."

    "It gave him pleasure as intense as before" >>> sounds odd to me, but I cannot see why??? >> maybe some native could tell me?

    "It gave him as intense a pleasure as before" >> I find it correct ( "pleasure can be countable or uncountable).
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    te gato said:
    Hi azz;

    I would change the sentence to:
    "It gave him intense pleasure as before."

    te gato;)


    But, tg, wouldn't you be changing the meaning in this sentence? I'm not sure that's why I'm asking...

    1)as intense pleasure as before >>> the same amount of pleasure

    2)intense pleasure as before >>> he felt intense pleasure before and now he feels it again, but here what we are stating is the event of "feeling intense pleasure" and I think that in case 1 we are telling sth about the intensity of the pleasure he felt.

    Help! :D
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Artrella said:
    But, tg, wouldn't you be changing the meaning in this sentence? I'm not sure that's why I'm asking...

    1)as intense pleasure as before >>> the same amount of pleasure

    2)intense pleasure as before >>> he felt intense pleasure before and now he feels it again, but here what we are stating is the event of "feeling intense pleasure" and I think that in case 1 we are telling sth about the intensity of the pleasure he felt.

    Help! :D
    Hey Art;
    I will be the first to admit..
    This one has me a little confused now..
    You know when you think too hard about something..you loose what origionally you were after...:eek:
    I just found that using "AS" that many times made the sentence odd "looking"..not wrong.....I am just looking for alternatives..and now I have "as"on the brain...
    te gato;)
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    jacinta said:
    I would say "It gave him the same intense pleasure as before".

    jacinta !!!;
    you are a life saver...that was what I was trying to think of..:D
    and here all I had to do was add "same"..
    Aghhh, my brain hurt over this one.
    te gato;)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    azz said:
    "It gave him as intense pleasure as before."

    Is this sentence grammatical?

    Although I agree with several people who have given you alternate versions of this sentence, please remember that the sentence is out of context.

    We tend to over-analyze something when we see it separated from a paragraph or a complete thought. BY ITSELF, it looks awkward to me, strange, but I have a feeling that if it were in a book, part of a narration, it might be fine.

    The problem is (as te gato pointed) that when you think about these things, even if they are right, suddenly they begin to look wrong. Too much thinking!

    In short, we may all be correcting a sentence that MAY be perfect as it is. :)

    Gaer
     
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