1. Roxana19

    Roxana19 Member

    Argentina
    Español - Argentina
    Hi! I hope you can help me with this one...

    Is there a name in English for a device used for cooking meat (usually lamb, or goat) that has a T form? The Spanish would be hacer/asar el cordero al asador.
    I found here on a spit, but it's not the same: when you cook lamb al asador, you put the whole animal spread out on an iron structure with a T form, so that you tie the front legs upward and the hind legs downward. Then, you plunge the structure into the ground, close to the fire but not ON the fire, and it cooks with the heat, not with the embers.

    I know this can be a little difficult, because it's a highly cultural term, but any opinions will be welcomed!!!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Andoush

    Andoush Senior Member

    Mallorca, Spain
    Spanish (Argentina)
    I'm also interested in knowing the answer to this thread so, here's a picture so see if this helps...
     
  3. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    It is spit.
    1spit
    noun \ˈspit\
    Definition of SPIT
    1: a slender pointed rod for holding meat over a fire
    Merriam-Webster

    Here I found this:
    Spit-roasting may be done either with the carcass suspended over the coals on a horizontal spit which revolves to allow the meat to cook evenly, or on a cross spit which is stuck into the ground at an angle of 45 degrees. The latter method, perfected in the Argentine and known as ‘asado’, requires that the carcass be split open and impaled on an iron rod with the crossbar to which the hind legs of the beast are attached.
    ...For the asado spit, both metal rods required for the asado spit should be flat, rather than round, about 1 inch wide, and ¼ inch thick. The crossbar, about 28 inches long, is welded at right angles to the 70 inch vertical rod 4 inches from one end. The other end is sharpened so that the rod sticks firmly into the ground. A metal hook, to which each hind shank of the carcass is fastened, is then welded to either end of the crossbar.
     
  4. Andoush

    Andoush Senior Member

    Mallorca, Spain
    Spanish (Argentina)
    How interesting Moritzchen! So it is "spit" after all (or cross spit)! Well I never ...
     
  5. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Whatever it is that you need this term for, I think you're going to have to describe the gaucho-style cross-spit or butterfly spit. It's not known here, and if you just say "spit" everyone will think of the regular kind of spit. A spit that neither skewers the meat nor rotates isn't really much of a spit at all.
     
  6. Roxana19

    Roxana19 Member

    Argentina
    Español - Argentina
    Thank you Moritzchen! I didn't know either!
     
  7. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    For the record, most of the hits on Google appear to be copies of the same original.
     
  8. Roxana19

    Roxana19 Member

    Argentina
    Español - Argentina
    Thank you K-in-sc! I think I'll write something expalining the term. Anyway, the cultural colour is lost... I haven't figured it out, but when I have a possible translation, I'll ask!

    Thank you very much!
     

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