'Asbo' and 'chav' make dictionary

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Jana337

Senior Member
čeština
An article about new English vocabulary, including
  • property porn
  • adultescent
  • brand Nazi
  • bouncebackability
and more.

You will like the picture of a chavette.

Jana
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Jana337 said:
    An article about new English vocabulary, including
    • property porn
    • adultescent
    • brand Nazi
    • bouncebackability
    and more.

    You will like the picture of a chavette.

    Jana
    Wow - BOUNCEBACKABILITIY???!!! Language evolution in action!

    If these words have made it, then words like "ingenuitive," "indigeneity," "exaggerative," and "misclarity" (which I have been championing for a while now...) should have made it a long long time ago! :)
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Jana337 said:
    An article about new English vocabulary, including
    • property porn
    • adultescent
    • brand Nazi
    • bouncebackability
    and more.

    You will like the picture of a chavette.

    Jana
    It is interesting, thanks Jana, but I feel all of those will soon slip back into obscurity. For 'bouncebackability' we already have resilience. 'Brand Nazi' - I think that is shallow and nasty and only useful to a minority. Adultescent, yes definitely a recognisable type but is the word descriptively up to it ? 'Property porn' - follows on the heels of British tv programs following on the heels of the house price boom - the tide is turning though, the expression might be ringing its own death knell. I am now trying to think of neologisms that have really filled a genuine need, I know there are some ... putting -gate on the end of words like Watergate, shorthand for scandal and useful to headline-writers... what else, help me out !


    'Asbo' is useful. I would prefer to say 'Asbo Barbie' than 'Chavette'
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Amityville said:
    I am now trying to think of neologisms that have really filled a genuine need, I know there are some ... putting -gate on the end of words like Watergate, shorthand for scandal and useful to headline-writers... what else, help me out !
    Blog, metrosexual...

    'Asbo' is useful. I would prefer to say 'Asbo Barbie' than 'Chavette'
    "Asbo Barbie" is cool! :thumbsup:

    Jana
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Amityville said:
    It is interesting, thanks Jana, but I feel all of those will soon slip back into obscurity. For 'bouncebackability' we already have resilience. 'Brand Nazi' - I think that is shallow and nasty and only useful to a minority. Adultescent, yes definitely a recognisable type but is the word descriptively up to it ? 'Property porn' - follows on the heels of British tv programs following on the heels of the house price boom - the tide is turning though, the expression might be ringing its own death knell. I am now trying to think of neologisms that have really filled a genuine need, I know there are some ... putting -gate on the end of words like Watergate, shorthand for scandal and useful to headline-writers... what else, help me out !


    'Asbo' is useful. I would prefer to say 'Asbo Barbie' than 'Chavette'
    What is an example of a word to which "-gate" was added to indicate a scandal?
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    elroy said:
    What is an example of a word to which "-gate" was added to indicate a scandal?
    Irangate, Whitewatergate, Monicagate, Nipplegate, Camillagate, Rathergate, and surely many more.

    Jana
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Thanks Jana,

    The article contained a perfect example of the difference between BE and AE. Perhaps we should coin a neologism to describe that distinction.

    "The new words in this edition do not only reflect change in our culture, but a change in the way we use our language."

    AE would not include the word in blue.

    regards,
    Cuchu
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    cuchuflete said:
    Thanks Jana,

    The article contained a perfect example of the difference between BE and AE. Perhaps we should coin a neologism to describe that distinction.

    "The new words in this edition do not only reflect change in our culture, but a change in the way we use our language."

    AE would not include the word in blue.

    regards,
    Cuchu
    Very true, although grammatically the sentence should read "The new words in this edition (do) reflect not only a change in our culture, but (also) a change in the way we use our language." (whether in British or American English! :))

    "Not only/but also" is a correlative coordinating conjunction that should surround parallel elements.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Cuchu:
    Don't jump on that particular example. That sentence clunks there for me as well. Those words almost certainly weren't actually said by Jeremy Butterfield:)
    Elroy:
    I think "asbo barbie" is WAY too intellectual (though appealing). For me, "chavette" includes exactly the right amount of crass - especially through association with "Chevette".
    Yeuggh - did I really write appealing up there?
    What I meant was, that association of asbo with chav rings true with me.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    panjandrum said:
    Cuchu:
    Don't jump on that particular example. That sentence clunks there for me as well. Those words almost certainly weren't actually said by Jeremy Butterfield:)
    Elroy:
    I think "asbo barbie" is WAY too intellectual (though appealing). For me, "chavette" includes exactly the right amount of crass - especially through association with "Chevette".
    Yeuggh - did I really write appealing up there?
    What I meant was, that association of asbo with chav rings true with me.
    I think you meant to say "Amityville" instead of "Elroy," since what you said does not address anything I said :D but does address what Amityville said in post #3. :)
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Tempted to say "sez who ?", elroy. Language changes, is versatile (see above), and to miss out the 'also' is common practice and doesn't detract from the sense or balance.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Amityville said:
    Tempted to say "sez who ?", elroy. Language changes, is versatile (see above), and to miss out the 'also' is common practice and doesn't detract from the sense or balance.
    If you're referring to the "also," I didn't insist on that. That's why I put it in parentheses - to show that you can express the sentence with or without it (I personally like to use it.)

    What are you referring to when you say "see above"?
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    elroy said:
    If you're referring to the "also," I didn't insist on that. That's why I put it in parentheses - to show that you can express the sentence with or without it (I personally like to use it.)

    What are you referring to when you say "see above"?
    I was referring to new words, change, things like that.;)
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Jana337 said:
    You will like the picture of a chavette.
    For the uninitiated, the chavette in question is Vicki Pollard, a character played by Matt Lucas in the TV comedy series Little Britain. One of the most amusing comedy characters ever, IMHO.


    panjandrum said:
    For me, "chavette" includes exactly the right amount of crass - especially through association with "Chevette".
    Oh no, now you've got me picturing a Vauxhall Chavette... :)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    cuchuflete said:
    Thanks Jana,

    The article contained a perfect example of the difference between BE and AE. Perhaps we should coin a neologism to describe that distinction.

    "The new words in this edition do not only reflect change in our culture, but a change in the way we use our language."




    AE would not include the word in blue.


    regards,
    Cuchu


    Frankly, I don't think a well-written sentence would contain it. Period. It's an awkward sentence and also contains an unnecessary comma. ;)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Jana337 said:
    An article about new English vocabulary, including
    • property porn
    • adultescent
    • brand Nazi
    • bouncebackability
    and more.

    You will like the picture of a chavette.

    Jana
    The last, "bouncebackability", is cute. I'm not sure it will replace "resiliency" though.

    "Brand Nazi" is silly because the word "Nazi" has been used for YEARS as an informal word to indicate a fanatic in any area

    Spelling Nazi
    Grammar Nazi

    Etc. So this is just one of a possible infinity of usages for this concept.

    I think these dictionary entries have been added too soon. I suspect many other words, already used and likely to become permanent additions, have been omitted.

    "Retrosexual" made me laugh though. :)

    Gaer
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    gaer said:
    Frankly, I don't think a well-written sentence would contain it. Period. It's an awkward sentence and also contains an unnecessary comma. ;)

    Gaer
    Interesting move there, considering you're usually so liberal and flexible about these things. ;)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    elroy said:
    Interesting move there, considering you're usually so liberal and flexible about these things. ;)
    Well:

    "The new words in this edition do not only reflect change in our culture, but a change in the way we use our language."

    Certainly you can insert a comma. :) The default rule is this:

    "I wrote a letter, and I mailed it."

    Obviously the comma is not needed in such a short sentence. So IF you want to insert something, why not make it emphasized. :)

    "I wrote a letter—and I mailed it!" (I would say such a thing, since I'm so absent-minded.)

    "I wrote a letter and mailed it."

    Here you not only do not need a comma, you really shouldn't use one either. Right?

    I think this is clearer and much smoother:

    "The new words in this edition not only reflect change in our culture but also a change in the way we use our language."

    Yes, I am usually a "liberal", but in this case something about the original sentence sounds terribly awkward to me. Does it sound smooth to you?

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Apparently in Poland, they have started saying "Zidanegate", referring to the whole Zidane scandal during the 2006 Germany World Cup.
    Since this thread has been given new life, I have a question:

    Am I the only person who did not know that what asbo/ASBO means? I just found out.
     
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