Asesora legal del Instituto de Aeronautica Civil de Cuba

Discussion in 'Legal Terminology' started by El Unicornio Azul, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. El Unicornio Azul

    El Unicornio Azul New Member

    Cuba
    ¨Español¨
    Hola, soy asesora legal de una empresa de aviación, estoy redactando mi curriculum vitae, quisiera como se traduce esta frase al inglés
    ¨ Asesora legal deL Instituto de Aeronautica Civil de Cuba¨

    saludos y gracias por su ayuda
     
  2. Iuris Tantum

    Iuris Tantum Banned

    Juneau
    Mexican Spanish
    Legal Advisor of the Institute of Civil Aeronautics of Cuba
     
  3. El Unicornio Azul

    El Unicornio Azul New Member

    Cuba
    ¨Español¨
    thanks, i appreciate your help
     
  4. RicardoElAbogado Senior Member

    SF Bay Area, California
    American English
    It can also be "Civil Aeronautics Institute," which is probably a more comon formulation in US English.

    Advisor is a tricky word. Many people (and most lawyers) spell it as "advisor," and it generally passes without objection. But that spelling (using OR instead of an ER) does not conform to the usual rule for converting verb into a word referring to the person who carries out the action of the verb. For example, we don't have farmors, ranchors, waitors, teachors, carpentors, writors, lawyors, and so on (though it is true that we have actors and directors).

    Here is a link that discusses the issue briefly.

    http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/agcomm/ontarget/0502/adviser_advisor.htm

    If you look around the web for "adviser vs. advisor" you will no doubt find controversy.

    Personally, I have a preference for "adviser" but I seem to be in the minority. When another lawyer sends me a document that he has written for me to review on behalf of my client, I don't ask that the document use "advisor" even though the custom is to ask for misspellings to be corrected. But when I am writing a document, I choose "adviser" over "advisor."
     

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