Ash pole

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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Resembles oak? :confused: You've funny ash trees in America! It's a different colour, it has a completely different grain pattern, and it is much easier to work with both hand tools and machines. But it is a very good wood where strength and light weight are wanted. (It was widely used in coachbuilding when cars had a wooden framework, and I make chairs from it)

    I think the text actually means a young ash tree - a pole still growing - rather than a pole made from an older tree.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Ash:


    American white oak:


    Some oak is blonder, some ash is darker. There are all kinds of variations. Admittedly I haven't seen that much ash in the flesh, so to speak. Good quality oak is often characterized by its medullary rays, the shiny bits that run across the grain. Ash doesn't have this. And that about exhausts my knowledge of ash hardwood, except that the European ash tree is seen all over the place in the East Bay as a very durable street tree.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Ash:


    American white oak:


    Some oak is blonder, some ash is darker. There are all kinds of variations. Admittedly I haven't seen that much ash in the flesh, so to speak. Good quality oak is often characterized by its medullary rays, the shiny bits that run across the grain. Ash doesn't have this. And that about exhausts my knowledge of ash hardwood, except that the European ash tree is seen all over the place in the East Bay as a very durable street tree.

    What most people notice is the open grain, which both species exhibit.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Apparently an ash pole [stave] was a weapon. They list them for sale on line. All the sites I found this on were selling them so I cannot link. But most were 84" long and apparently still used for martial arts practice.
     
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