Asian females/women

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
As I read the Nature graph of the report (What the data say about police shootings), I comment in my mind: It looks as if that Asian females have never been shot by police in the United States. So they are safer than white women there - America, paradise for Asian women? (Click graph to read the information bar)

The question of this thread is which is more commin in US: Asian females or Asian women?
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Personally I don't like "females" in your context.
    When male/female is used as a noun, it makes your writing sound like you're talking about a part of a herd of cattle. :eek: So, this is sort of disrespectful. The females of our species are called women and the males are called men, so why not call them that way?

    When these words are used as an adjective then this problem does not exist. When you talk about female residents/tourists/immigrants it does not convey that generalizing and pejorative attitude of the speaker as the noun 'females' does.

    That's just my personal opinion. Wait for other views.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Presumably they used male and female, based on autopsy findings, so they didn't have to worry about categorizing trans men and women and those who had yet to make up their minds.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Presumably they used male and female, based on autopsy findings, so they didn't have to worry about categorizing trans men and women and those who had yet to make up their minds.
    :) I'm not going to comment on the gender identity issue, but it's a still a good example.
    If pathologists refer to their "clients" as females and males, it sounds quite alright. For one, pathologists are supposed to use technical terms and then, it probably helps to think of all those dead bodies that you have to dissect in terms of scientific categories, rather than people. It helps to emotionally detach from the objects of your work, I would guess.

    I comment in my mind: It looks as if that Asian females have never been shot by police in the United States. So they are safer than white women there - America, paradise for Asian women?
    If you want to avoid any kind of negative connotation, you should rephrase this to: "It looks as if female Asians had never been shot by police in the United States. So they are safer than white women there - America, paradise for Asian women?"
    It's a simple change but it makes a big difference.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Given that you're making a comment on a graph that uses the words "Males" and "Females", I don't think you need to worry about political views on the subject. If someone who wants to look at the data for themselves and find the thin blue bar showing that some Asian/Pacific Islander females actually were shot by police, it's helpful to know that the word "female" is on the chart somewhere.
    I do think it's odd to mix "females" and "women."
     

    GFMontagne

    New Member
    English - USA
    Generally speaking, if unsure, I would go with "women" over "females". In this context, "women" is strongly preferred. "Female" is fine for the graph (due to it's scientific nature), but "women" should be used when speaking about it.

    I would also add that I hear "female" used much more often from people who live in rural areas of the US. In urban (and more affluent) areas calling women "females" is seen as demeaning (as if one is talking about animals).
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    It is silly and inaccurate to refer to (for example) a 9-year old girl as a "woman"; the term "women" refers only to adults. However, the term "females" includes female persons of any age. Thus, if you are writing a statistical report about female human beings of any age, including adolescents and children, one should not use the term women, but should instead use a more inclusive term -- such as females.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    I fully agree, GWB.
    But I also noticed that you chose to say "female human beings" and not "human females". :) So, I assume that in general you'd be more inclined to use 'female' as a modifying adjective rather than a generalizing noun.
    Personally, I'd very much prefer to be referred to as 'that man/guy/dude/boy/etc' than 'that male'. Outside of pathology and nature programs, where you often hear "the males (of that species) are characterized by...', it is sort of a dehumanizing term in everyday language.
     
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