aside and beside

  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Beside" is the ordinary word when it functions as a preposition: The tree stood beside the road.

    "Aside" is a fairly uncommon word that can be used as an adverb. It used to function as a preposition, but it no longer does so in modern English. You can learn more about these two words by studying their definitions in a good dictionary. Here is a link to the WR dictionary's definitions for "aside". You can find the definitions for "beside" by typing them into the dictionary's search window.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Possibly in rare and constructed circumstances.

    "There was one chair to the left and one chair to the right of the clock. They chose a chair and sat aside/beside the clock."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Possibly in rare and constructed circumstances.

    "There was one chair to the left and one chair to the right of the clock. They chose a chair and sat aside/beside the clock."
    Paul, that use of "aside" would have been fine in Shakespeare's day or earlier. Its use as a preposition is now archaic.

    Hello, Bladerunner. In this sentence, "aside" functions normally as an adverb: Move the chair aside. (Aside = to one side)
     

    bladerunner9405

    Senior Member
    venezuela castellano
    Paul, that use of "aside" would have been fine in Shakespeare's day or earlier. Its use as a preposition is now archaic.

    Hello, Bladerunner. In this sentence, "aside" functions normally as an adverb: Move the chair aside. (Aside = to one side)
    Thanks Owlman, I get it now, aside is more like middle english as compare to beside when used as a preposition, but nowdays it only functions as an adverb!!!!! many thanks
     
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