ask / ask for

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semeeran

Senior Member
Indian Tamil, India
DaylightDelight answered me as below vide :
ask VS require
=> I think the standard usage is "ask you a favor" without "for".
But my friend says "Don't ask him money." is not correct,
while "Don't ask him for money." is correct.
Please comment and enlighten me.
Thanks.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Do me a favor" is probably most common, but either "ask you a favor" or "ask you for a favor" will work. With "don't ask him for money" the preposition is mandatory.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I have heard both "ask you a favour" and ask you for a favour", as The Newt says.

    Im not sure why but I'd hesitate to say that "Don't ask him money" is grammatically wrong. "Don't ask him for money" is definitely correct.
     
    Last edited:

    semeeran

    Senior Member
    Indian Tamil, India
    1a. Ask help.
    1b. = Ask for help.
    2a. She asked him his help.
    2b. She asked him for his help.
    2c. She asked his help.
    2d. She asked for his help.
    Please check the above sentences and classify which are correct.
    Thanks for enlightening me.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    2a is wrong. 2b and 2d are both correct.

    2c could possibly be grammatically correct; it sounds like something that might have been used in the past but it's not the usual way of saying it.

    1a and 1b aren't sentences.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    We ask a question (direct object), and we ask a person a question (two objects). For any other thing, we ask for it, and we ask a person for it. But 'favour' can behave like 'question' or like any other object. I can't think of any other word that can behave like 'question'.
     

    DaylightDelight

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Tokyo
    semeeran, Sorry, my comment seems to have confused you.
    I had only the cases about "a favor" in my mind when I posted that, and I meant only that I hear "ask you a favor" much more often than "ask you for a favor". I didn't mean "for a favor" was wrong or anything.
     
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