"ask someone of"

  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Are you sure you're not talking about "about?"

    Can I ask you about money? (You want to know something about money and hope the other person will provide the answer.)
    Can I ask you about dating me? (You want to know if the other person is interested in dating you.)
    I'll ask him about some comments on this question. (You want to ask someone about comments you heard regarding a question).

    The only time I would hear "ask someone of" is before some sort of noun descriptor about the person.

    For example: If you want to know about the specific customs of the Ubutu people, you need to ask someone of that background.

    This is a very awkward construction so would rarely be used.
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    Or maybe to ask something of someone is the phrase in question? You could say, "He asked money of them." That is a little formal, and maybe a little outdated. But I don't think anyone would use those words when actually asking for something. To say, "May I ask money of you" is awkward--probably because it seems overly formal.

    That phrasing doesn't work with a date. One asks someone for a date, or one asks someone to go out on a date. To ask a date of someone doesn't quite work.

    Your third example doesn't make sense. You need for instead of of. I'll ask him for some comment on this question.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Thanks, thanks! I'm sorry about my messed-up examples.
    The only time I would hear "ask someone of" is before some sort of noun descriptor about the person.

    For example: If you want to know about the specific customs of the Ubutu people, you need to ask someone of that background.

    This is a very awkward construction so would rarely be used.
    I'm sorry, but could you tell me what "noun descriptor" means?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top