ask who are rich out/ask out who are rich

moyeea

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hello, everyone,

I was taught that some phrasal verbs must be separated:

ask out;

They asked Jane out. not They asked out Jane.

But if it is a clause, how shall I express(because normally we say "write down what happened")

SO which one is correct? ask who are rich out / ask out who are rich

Thanks a lot!
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I was taught that some phrasal verbs must be separated:
    ask out;
    They asked Jane out. not They asked out Jane.
    OK, but the rule is not strictly applied if the object is long: I asked out the prettiest girl in the class.
    which one is correct? ask who are rich out / ask out who are rich
    Neither of these is correct because the relative pronoun needs an express antecedent here: Ask out all the girls who are rich.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    OK, but the rule is not strictly applied if the object is long: I asked out the prettiest girl in the class.
    Thanks so much for your help!

    One more example,

    I can't get it through to my students.

    Why here can put it?

    I looked up the dictionaries, just says the phrasal verb is " get through to"

    This kind of structure" verb+adverb+preposition" can't be separated ,right? like "catch up with" "keep up with""look forward to"

    "get it through to" is an exception or we can say

    "I should get these answers through to my students?"

    Thanks so much!
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's you who gets through (or doesn't get through) to the students, not the answers. In other words, we would say 'I can't get through to my students'.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    It's you who gets through (or doesn't get through) to the students, not the answers. In other words, we would say 'I can't get through to my students'.
    Thanks so much!

    But “ get through to” is a phrasal verb, it is a unit,normally it can't be separated except “ it”

    Am I right?
     
    "I can't get through to my students" = in general as a sweeping statement, it seems no matter what I try to communicate or teach, my students can't seem to grasp any of the involved concepts. General failure to communicate.

    "He keeps calling the school, but he can't get through." (The line is busy, nobody picks up the phone to answer." General failure to communicate.

    Using it or that as a specific post referent, and using "head" as the would- be target of understanding: Communication about an idea occurs, but is rejected/not really accepted.

    "I just can't get it through my head that she really intends to divorce me."

    (I understand the reality of what she told me, but it's so stunning, it swirls around in my mind to the point of being unbelievable.)
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    "I can't get through to my students" = in general as a sweeping statement, it seems no matter what I try to communicate or teach, my students can't seem to grasp any of the involved concepts. General failure to communicate.

    "He keeps calling the school, but he can't get through." (The line is busy, nobody picks up the phone to answer." General failure to communicate.

    Using it or that as a specific post referent, and using "head" as the would- be target of understanding: Communication about an idea occurs, but is rejected/not really accepted.

    "I just can't get it through my head that she really intends to divorce me."

    (I understand the reality of what she told me, but it's so stunning, it swirls around in my mind to the point of being unbelievable.)
    Thanks so much!

    That means you can just put "it" in the middle of "get through to"

    You can't say "get knowledge through to somebody"

    Am I right?
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    OK, but the rule is not strictly applied if the object is long: I asked out the prettiest girl in the class.

    Neither of these is correct because the relative pronoun needs an express antecedent here: Ask out all the girls who are rich.
    Thanks so much!

    But I don't put who as a relative pronoun, it is the subject of the object clause.

    Like: write down what you learnt yesterday=write down the things that you learnt yesterday.

    make friends with who helped you=make friends with people who helped you.
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    OK, but the rule is not strictly applied if the object is long: I asked out the prettiest girl in the class.

    Neither of these is correct because the relative pronoun needs an express antecedent here: Ask out all the girls who are rich.
    Thanks so much!

    But how to define if it is too long?

    Can I say:

    I asked all the pretty girls out yesterday.

    Thanks so much!
     
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