aspect in the infinitive

turkjey5

Senior Member
English - USA
И когда потом тетя вышла, Вера стояла среди своей комнаты, не зная, одеваться ей или опять лечь.

Почему использоваеться несовершенный вид с "одеватьстя," а совершенный вид с "лечь"?

Спасибо
 
Last edited:
  • wushih

    Member
    BCN
    russian-spanish
    Лечь - тоже совершенный вид.

    В той фразе есть вещи, которые мне не очень. Например, "среди своей комнаты". Правильнее было бы "посреди"

    Лечь - что сделать? Ложиться - что делать? С.в. и н.в.

    Одеваться - что делать? н.в. Совершнный вид - "одеться".
     

    Ptak

    Senior Member
    Rußland
    И когда потом тетя вышла, Вера стояла среди своей комнаты, не зная, одеваться ей или опять лечь.

    Почему использоваеться совершенный вид с "одеватьстя," а несовершенный вид с "лечь"?

    Спасибо
    Одеваться - процесс. Возможно, долгий. To be dressing herself.
    Лечь - одно короткое действие. To lie down.

    P.S. "Среди своей комнаты" is okay.
     

    wushih

    Member
    BCN
    russian-spanish
    Try to feel it this way_
    ... she didn't know whether to start dressing (process) or to lie down again (act).
    Probably it is not correct, it's just a suggestion

    Почти совпали...
     
    Last edited:

    turkjey5

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Одеваться - процесс. Возможно, долгий. To be dressing herself.
    Лечь - одно короткое действие. To lie down.

    P.s. "Среди своей комнаты" is okay.

    Спасибо
     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I would like to use this old thread to ask for clarifications for the choice of the correct aspect (perfective/imperfective) for a verb in the infinitive. This topic has been discussed in, e.g., these threads:
    невозможно + глаголы сов. и несов. вида
    What is the difference between забывать and забыть?
    не хочу ехать vs хочу поехать

    I took a short story I've read some time ago and analysed it. For now, let us consider the following three sentences (my chosen verb in bold).

    1. Сего́дня что́бы име́ть хоро́шую рабо́ту, необяза́тельно [выходи́ть|вы́йти] из до́ма.
    Imperfective seems preferable to me because the sentence is generic (no reference to a specific instance or to a result) and, perhaps, there is a hint of repetitivity ('it is never necessary to go out'). However the perfective doesn't seem obviously totally wrong to me.

    2. Я увлека́лся компью́терами ещё со шко́льных лет. Нет, я не про́сто игра́л в компью́терные и́гры и сиде́л в социа́льных сетя́х. Я хоте́л [знать|узнать], как они́ рабо́тают, как создаю́тся програ́ммы, как разраба́тываются приложе́ния.
    Both imperfective and perfective seem to me possible here, with a very slight difference in meaning ('I wanted to know how they worked' vs 'I wanted to learn (to get to know) how they worked'.

    3. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя [иска́ть|поиска́ть] рабо́ту, я мог [пода́ть|подава́ть] зая́вки в деся́тки фирм и меня́ при́няли бы.
    In the first case, as in 2. above, both perfective and imperfective seem conceivable to me with a slight difference in meaning (~'time to look for a job' vs 'time to find a job'); in the second case I'm unsure but I'll go with the perfective; I'm unsure because 'in tens of companies' implies the action is repeated many times, which might suggest imperfective is perhaps not wrong...?
     
    Last edited:

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    1. Сего́дня что́бы име́ть хоро́шую рабо́ту, необяза́тельно [выходи́ть|вы́йти] из до́ма.
    Imperfective seems preferable to me because the sentence is generic (no reference to a specific instance or to a result) and, perhaps, there is a hint of repetitivity ('it is never necessary to go out'). However the perfective doesn't seem obviously totally wrong to me.
    Only imperfective (выходить) here, because the action is not a single, unique scenario.
    2. Я увлека́лся компью́терами ещё со шко́льных лет. Нет, я не про́сто игра́л в компью́терные и́гры и сиде́л в социа́льных сетя́х. Я хоте́л [знать|узнать], как они́ рабо́тают, как создаю́тся програ́ммы, как разраба́тываются приложе́ния.
    Both imperfective and perfective seem to me possible here, with a very slight difference in meaning ('I wanted to know how they worked' vs 'I wanted to learn (to get to know) how they worked'.
    True, and the point is that 'to know how they worked' is a continuous state but 'to get to know' is a single, unique achievement.
    3. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя [иска́ть|поиска́ть] рабо́ту, я мог [пода́ть|подава́ть] зая́вки в деся́тки фирм и меня́ при́няли бы.
    In the first case, as in 2. above, both perfective and imperfective seem conceivable to me with a slight difference in meaning (~'time to look for a job' vs 'time to find a job'); in the second case I'm unsure but I'll go with the perfective; I'm unsure because 'in tens of companies' implies the action is repeated many times, which might suggest imperfective is perhaps not wrong...?
    наста́ло вре́мя [иска́ть|поиска́ть] рабо́ту -
    The difference is not actually like 'to look for' vs 'to find'. Иска́ть means to look continuously or repeatedly, this only tells about forthcoming process without implying its end, as if this will be being done infinitely. Поиска́ть means to spend some time for this - that is, you will be looking for a job but only for a while; but this is, again, a specific unique scenario. Поиска́ть sounds not serious - as if you are only pretending that you want a job.
    Пода́ть again, means either a single unique request or a single unique summation of many of them. Подава́ть is a process of requesting, continuous or repeating.

    There's also some verbal modality conflict in your sentence - мог but при́няли бы.
    Rephrase it somehow -

    Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм, зная (заранее), что меня́ при́няли бы.
    (or - ...что меня примут).

    Or - Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я знал, что могу подать зая́вку в любую из деся́тков фирм и меня примут.
    (note the link between action 'singularity' and the perfective aspect).

    but -

    Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм - но без успеха.
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    наста́ло вре́мя [иска́ть|поиска́ть] рабо́ту -
    The difference is not actually like 'to look for' vs 'to find'. Иска́ть means to look continuously or repeatedly, this only tells about forthcoming process without implying its end, as if this will be being done infinitely. Поиска́ть means to spend some time for this - that is, you will be looking for a job but only for a while; but this is, again, a specific unique scenario. Поиска́ть sounds not serious - as if you are only pretending that you want a job.

    Thanks for all your explanations! I understand. A perhaps related consideration is that many dictionary do not consider искать and поискать a genuine aspectual pair; in this situation my understand is that the по- prefix is not "empty" but adds the meaning 'for a while', so that the sentence would mean something similar to 'when the time came to look for a while for a job...', which is not grammatically incorrect but sounds strange and funny.

    If I understand correctly, for the second part of the sentence all of the following would be okay:
    A. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм, зная заранее, что меня́ при́няли бы.
    Imperfective to focus on the repetition of the action.

    B. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог пода́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм, зная заранее, что меня́ при́няли бы.
    Perfective, treating all the job applications as a single round and with emphasis on the result of the action (expressed in the last part of the sentence).

    C. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм - но без успеха.
    Only imperfective is possible because there is no end result.

    Is my understanding more-or-less correct?
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    so that the sentence would mean something similar to 'when the time came to look for a while for a job...', which is not grammatically incorrect but sounds strange and funny.
    The Russian counterpart does not necessarily sound as strange as English "for a while". In general, it means something like "to spend some time for searching", but, more exactly, it is not about 'some time' but just about 'some amount of searching'. This is what 'по-' generally means - 'some amount or portion of the process done' (except uni-motion verbs where it means the beginning of process, and some other cases as that of подать or e.g. distributive actions towards a set of objects). The actual sense of поискать depends on a context, but anyway, as applied to job searching it sounds somewhat careless.
    If I understand correctly, for the second part of the sentence all of the following would be okay:
    A. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм, зная заранее, что меня́ при́няли бы.
    Imperfective to focus on the repetition of the action.
    Yes.

    B. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог пода́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм, зная заранее, что меня́ при́няли бы.
    Perfective, treating all the job applications as a single round and with emphasis on the result of the action (expressed in the last part of the sentence).

    C. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм - но без успеха.
    Only imperfective is possible because there is no end result.
    Yes. Actually, the point is the verb мочь which meaning's subtleties are tricky, as in many other languages.
    E.g. Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог пода́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм - но я не сделал этого.
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Yes. Actually, the point is the verb мочь which meaning's subtleties are tricky, as in many other languages.
    I think I understand, thanks! Phew, that was tricky.

    I'll go on and consider two more sentences.

    1. Изве́стная компа́ния собира́лась [откры́ть|открыва́ть] инновацио́нную платфо́рму для онлайн-прода́ж.
    My understanding (correct?) of the structure 'собираюсь + infinitive' is that if the infinitive is imperfective then it rather means 'I am about to' (Что делаешь? Я собираюсь пить чай / ложиться спать), while if the infinitive is perfective it rather means 'I have the intention of, I intend, I plan' (Я собираюсь купить себе новый фотоаппарат).
    Now, in the context of the sentence both meanings seem possible to me. I picked the perfective form откры́ть, although открыва́ть (which perhaps has a focus on the process of creating the new platform rather than the end result) also seems okay to me...

    2. Мы хоти́м [посмотре́ть|смотре́ть], — сказа́л ме́неджер на о́бщем собра́нии, — как вы уме́ете [реша́ть| реши́ть] пробле́мы, [рабо́тать|порабо́тать] в кома́нде, [примени́ть|применя́ть] свои́ зна́ния и [принима́ть|приня́ть] реше́ния.

    This is another fairly tricky section, for me. For context: the manager is offering to the candidates and intership.
    a. Мы хоти́м смотре́ть I picked imperfective (ie "we want to observe"), although perfective seems also possible to me ("we want to see (once and for all) how you work, so that we can then take a decision")
    For the other verbs, I picked all the imperfective forms because, it seems to me, the mentioned actions (solve problems, work, change opinions, take decisions) are generic and (possibly) repeated many times, and do not produce any particular result.
    In particular, for рабо́тать vs порабо́тать, it seems to me that the imperfective is the only possible choice.
    For the other three verbs I'm less sure and the perfective forms do not sound obviously wrong to my foreign ears.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    1. Изве́стная компа́ния собира́лась [откры́ть|открыва́ть] инновацио́нную платфо́рму для онлайн-прода́ж.
    My understanding (correct?) of the structure 'собираюсь + infinitive' is that if the infinitive is imperfective then it rather means 'I am about to' (Что делаешь? Я собираюсь пить чай / ложиться спать), while if the infinitive is perfective it rather means 'I have the intention of, I intend, I plan' (Я собираюсь купить себе новый фотоаппарат).
    Yes; the key to the paradigm is the structure of action itself. The imperfective for the infinitive "cобира́лась открыва́ть" would sound as if they are planning to enter into a process of doing many steps related to the opening stage, during an indefinite period; but, as for this formal context, their goal is namely to get this platform open, not just to be involved in doing that. Otherwise it is often used informally to focus on the preliminary stage as e.g. "Он уже собирался открывать свой бизнес, но тут случилось то, что...."
     
    Last edited:

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    2. Мы хоти́м [посмотре́ть|смотре́ть], — сказа́л ме́неджер на о́бщем собра́нии, — как вы уме́ете [реша́ть| реши́ть] пробле́мы, [рабо́тать|порабо́тать] в кома́нде, [примени́ть|применя́ть] свои́ зна́ния и [принима́ть|приня́ть] реше́ния.
    смотре́ть , as any imperfective, denotes a continuous process, and means either to watch or to be continuously looking at it, staring. Я не хочу идти на работу, я хочу смотреть кино - разные фильмы. Он так любил её, что хотел смотреть на неё бесконечно. As Şafak noted, either увидеть or посмотреть (the latter is more like 'to take a look').

    Уметь always takes imperfective infinitives - except some colloquial turns where it has a sense close to мочь.
    The same is true for любить (except again, colloquial uses for the sense of 'to do it from time to time' e.g. the set phrase люблю выпить).
    The reason is obvious - if you know how to do it, have skills to, or like it, it is about the process as is, not of a specific scenario.
     
    Last edited:
    "Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог пода́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм"

    To me, it doesn't sound natural. I would say "Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог подава́ть зая́вки в деся́тки фирм"
    or
    "Когда́ наста́ло вре́мя иска́ть рабо́ту, я мог пода́ть зая́вку в эту/ту фирму"
     
    И когда потом тетя вышла, Вера стояла среди своей комнаты, не зная, одеваться ей или опять лечь
    We don't say like that, "стояла среди своей комнаты". As I understand, it's from Anton Chekhov, our famous writer, who died almost 120 years ago. So, it's a bit old-fashioned.

     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thank you all again! I'll go on and consider the next few sentences.

    1. Что́бы вы могли́ [отда́ть|отдава́ть] всё своё вре́мя и эне́ргию на́шему прое́кту, мы бу́дем плати́ть вам неплоху́ю зарпла́ту.
    Imperfective seems better to me because it coordinates with the continuous future 'мы бу́дем плати́ть вам' in the last part. In this context the sentence sounds to me "we will be paying you good money, and you will be devoting all your time and energy", ie describing two contemporary processes. I wonder if отда́ть can be possible if the last part of the sentence was different; perhaps : (?) Что́бы вы могли́ отда́ть всё своё вре́мя и эне́ргию на́шему прое́кту, когда всё будет готово мы запла́тим вам неплоху́ю зарпла́ту. (?)

    2. Я до́лжен [де́лать|сде́лать] всё возмо́жное, что́бы [становиться|стать] одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [дока́зывать|доказа́ть] всем, что я лу́чший.
    The choice between де́лать and сде́лать is particularly tricky for me... In English 'I should be doing everything possible' and 'I should do everything possible' sound interchangeable to me.
    In any case, perfective forms seem preferable to me in this case. Я до́лжен сде́лать всё возмо́жное seems preferable to me because this is something that should happen (fully, to the end) so that the next action can take place ('become one of the best candidates'). Again, it seems to me that the choice де́лать/сде́лать can be made only by reading the whole sentence to the end, and that if after the comma the sentence went on differently then до́лжен could also work; perhaps:
    Я до́лжен де́лать всё возмо́жное, но одновре́ме́нно ты до́лжен быть мне благода́рен.

    Having chosen сде́лать it seems to me that one is then forced to chose perfective forms for the other verbs (стать, доказа́ть).

    3. Не́сколько раз, когда́ никто́ из нас не мог [реша́ть|реши́ть] зада́чу,
    Perfective, because we are talking about (lack of) a result, not about the process of trying to solve a task.
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Что́бы вы могли́ отда́ть всё своё вре́мя и эне́ргию на́шему прое́кту, когда всё будет готово мы запла́тим вам неплоху́ю зарпла́ту. (?)
    I have no idea what it means.

    Что́бы вы могли́ [отда́ть|отдава́ть] всё своё вре́мя и эне́ргию на́шему прое́кту, мы бу́дем плати́ть вам неплоху́ю зарпла́ту.
    "Чтобы вы отдавали" is better but your sentence works.

    Я до́лжен [де́лать|сде́лать] всё возмо́жное, что́бы [становиться|стать] одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [дока́зывать|доказа́ть] всем, что я лу́чший.
    :thumbsup:

    Не́сколько раз, когда́ никто́ из нас не мог [реша́ть|реши́ть] зада́чу,
    :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I mean, of course it makes some sense but the wording is pretty off. At least this is how I’d word it.
    I see... any more hints? It should mean "So that you can give all your time and energy to the project, when everything is ready we will pay you a good wage"
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    I don’t like the English sentence either. I don’t think people can say something like this. For me the logic is flawed. My biggest problem is «могли» in the sentence. You either dedicate your free time to the project or don’t. There’s no “can, could”. You give your free time and energy to the project, we pay you a good salary in return. That’s it. Just remove this «могли», conjugate the next verb properly, put a full stop (+ there’s one comma missing). Instead of «когда все будет готово», I’d say: по окончании / завершении работы / проекта.

    Мы будем неплохо платить вам, но нам надо, чтобы вы отдавали все свои силы и энергию проекту.

    If they only pay you well once the project is finished, I can’t call it a salary.
     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I don’t like the English sentence either. I don’t think people can say something like this.

    I agree: the sentence is not great in wording and structure; however all I am interested in is the choice of aspect of the verbs in the infinitive, and that's why I kept it close to the original one (BTW: it is probablе that the "original" Russian sentence, which I took from a book for Russian learners, is itself a translation from English).
    Мы будем неплохо платить вам, но нам надо, чтобы вы отдавали все свои силы и энергию проекту.

    okay...but my question was whether it is possible to use the perfective forms заплатить/отдать. How about:
    Если вы готовы отдать все свои силы проекту, мы обещаем заплатить вам большой гонорар по окончании работы .
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    1. Что́бы вы могли́ [отда́ть|отдава́ть] всё своё вре́мя и эне́ргию на́шему прое́кту, мы бу́дем плати́ть вам неплоху́ю зарпла́ту.
    Imperfective seems better to me because it coordinates with the continuous future 'мы бу́дем плати́ть вам' in the last part. In this context the sentence sounds to me "we will be paying you good money, and you will be devoting all your time and energy"
    :tick: Если вы будете отдавать всё своё время и энергию проекту, мы будем платить вам хорошую зарплату.
    Why "чтобы" (which can only mean "in order to" at the beginning of a sentence)? :confused: Apart from that, your reasoning about parallel continuous forms makes perfect sense!

    P. S. I guess I now see what the original was supposed to mean ("We will pay you well so that you could devote all your time..."), but I have to say that it took me some time. The sentence sounds a bit odd, and that's probably a cultural thing. I can imagine it being said in a sect. :rolleyes:

    Если вы готовы отдать все свои силы проекту, мы обещаем заплатить вам большой гонорар по окончании работы .
    Okay, but I'd reword that a little bit:
    :tick: Если вы готовы отдать все свои силы проекту, то можете рассчитывать на большой гонорар по окончании работы .
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Here is one more sentence:
    Я до́лжен [де́лать|сде́лать] всё возмо́жное, что́бы стать одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [дока́зывать|доказа́ть] всем, что я лу́чший.

    In the first case I [think I] know from memorization that expressions such as я должен сделать всё, (что в моих силах/на что способен/...) take perfective сделать and not imperfective. Although I don't really feel it deep in my bones, I think perfective is necessary because this is something that should happen (do everything possible) so that something something else can happen (to become one of the best candidates). I hesitate because to me "do everything possible" is intrinsically a process extended in time. I suppose considerations of the "result / no result" type are the decisive ones in this case.

    Having chosen сделать it seems to me that one is more or less forced to chose perfective доказать for the second verb: you do everything possible and then you show, once and for all, that you are the best: a sequence of point-events.
    However, also in this case I don't feel confident because "to show everyone that I am the best" appears to me to be a continuous process which takes place over an undetermined stretch of time (you don't show that you are the best once and for all on a particular instance, but prove it over the course of time).
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Я до́лжен [де́лать|сде́лать] всё возмо́жное, что́бы стать одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [дока́зывать|доказа́ть] всем, что я лу́чший.
    :tick:

    I'm so sorry but I keep skipping your complicated explanations and reasoning behind choosing the right aspect because I don't know anything about it. I can only check whether or not your sentences sound correct.
     

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I'm so sorry but I keep skipping your complicated explanations and reasoning behind choosing the right aspect because I don't know anything about it. I can only check whether or not your sentences sound correct.
    Thanks! That's already valuable. It seems to be particularly difficult for me to get an instictive intuition of perfective/imperfective pairs in the infinitive by simply passively reading texts.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Here is one more sentence:
    Я до́лжен [де́лать|сде́лать] всё возмо́жное, что́бы стать одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [дока́зывать|доказа́ть] всем, что я лу́чший.

    In the first case I [think I] know from memorization that expressions such as я должен сделать всё, (что в моих силах/на что способен/...) take perfective сделать and not imperfective. Although I don't really feel it deep in my bones, I think perfective is necessary because this is something that should happen (do everything possible) so that something something else can happen (to become one of the best candidates). I hesitate because to me "do everything possible" is intrinsically a process extended in time. I suppose considerations of the "result / no result" type are the decisive ones in this case.

    Two options possible:

    1) Я до́лжен де́лать всё возмо́жное, что́бы стать одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и доказа́ть всем, что я лу́чший.

    Here, де́лать is a progressive flow that leads to one single transition: стать и (таким образом) доказа́ть .

    2) Я до́лжен (всегда) де́лать всё возмо́жное, что́бы каждый раз становиться одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и [(таким образом) доказыва́ть | в итоге доказать ], что я лу́чший.

    Here, the flow of де́лать is seen at the larger time scale, thus it becomes an iterative, habitual cycle of 'doings' with an intermediate становится and, either each-time-performed доказыва́ть, or a final summing up доказать .

    It is the context what actually lets us know about that there was not only 'doing' but also its results - "each time becoming" which marks habitability explicitly - for the imperfective itself, it does not matter whether the 'doing' led to something or not.

    Сделать is always a single completion, a transition from one state to another: undone -> done; делать is a flow of phases, where each phase is a 'quant' of the process (a "micro-transition") - and, if the context supplies a habitual sense, as well these phases may imply a presence of completions, of "scenario- level transitions" (that which are denoted by "сделал" ) - "Я делал это много раз". But, it is a pragmatical sense, obtained from the context. The basis is in either case the flow of progressive 'doing', and, it is only the context, specifically adverbials, what explicitly shows that there were not only micro-phases, but as well completions of scenarios.
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    1) Я до́лжен де́лать всё возмо́жное, что́бы стать одни́м из десяти́ лу́чших кандида́тов и доказа́ть всем, что я лу́чший.

    Thanks! So the sentence above, with imperfective делать/доказать, is also possible. Good to know, as it seems to be to represent an alternative, but equally valid, way of seeing the same situation. BTW, I've just finished ready a 100-page booklet (it's called 'Perfettivo o Imperfettivo? Questo è il Dilemma!' - in Italian) on the choice of perfective/imperfective in Russian and, together with consideration on this forum, it has been very useful.
    Next sentence:

    Мо́жет быть, у него́ каки́е-то пробле́мы. Не́сколько раз я хоте́л [поговори́ть|говори́ть] с ним, и́ли сесть ря́дом с ним за обе́дом, и́ли [идти́|пойти́] с ним вме́сте до метро́.

    The rule I know is that structure with хотеть + infinitive by default take perfective verbs, unless 1. the process is repeated many times (Я хочу тренироваться каждый день) 2. the process takes a long period of time (Я хочу жить у моря) 3. the process is a bodily desire (я хочу пить). On this basis I picked perfective forms, although they don't seem particularly logical to me.

    Specifically, in the first case говорить/поговорить in the context of the phrase there's no specific problem to be discussed or result to be expect, the person just says he wanted to 'have a chat' to get to know the other person.

    In the second case, идти́/пойти́, imperfective makes actually more logical sense to me, because the person wants to be going with the other person (spend time walking so that they can talk) rather than get to the destination.
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Мо́жет быть, у него́ каки́е-то пробле́мы. Не́сколько раз я хоте́л [поговори́ть|говори́ть] с ним, и́ли сесть ря́дом с ним за обе́дом, и́ли [идти́|пойти́] с ним вме́сте до метро́.
    :tick:
    I can read and tick these sentences all day long. :D
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks! So the sentence above, with imperfective делать/доказать, is also possible.
    I should add that for #1, сделать is as well fine; the difference here is whether you are rather focusing on your efforts without thinking of a result (делать) or more strongly stressing that successful completion is important (сделать).

    Мо́жет быть, у него́ каки́е-то пробле́мы. Не́сколько раз я хоте́л [поговори́ть|говори́ть] с ним, и́ли сесть ря́дом с ним за обе́дом, и́ли [идти́|пойти́] с ним вме́сте до метро́.
    All perfectives in this case - Не́сколько раз я хоте́л поговори́ть с ним, и́ли сесть/посидеть ря́дом с ним за обе́дом, и́ли пойти́ с ним вме́сте до метро́.
    Imperfective would sound weird here (except maybe идти in colloquial speech) - as if you just want to found yourself talking with him or sitting next to him or walking together as if in a frozen frame from a melodramatic movie. It would work if we remove the practical sense of "Не́сколько раз" -
    "Мне хотелось говорить и говорить с ним, сидеть с ним рядом, идти вместе по городу, смеяться и говорить глупости".
    Here, the progressive side of imperfective aspect is used to build an imagery of that state.

    The point is the desire itself. Хотеть + imperf is like some emotional itching, where your imagination pictures the wanted process (either activity or a continuous state) as is.
    Хотеть + perf is about what you want to achieve.
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I should add that for #1, сделать is as well fine; the difference here is whether you are rather focusing on your efforts without thinking of a result (делать) or more strongly stressing that successful completion is important (сделать).
    thanks, that very clear and illuminating!


    [...]
    The point is the desire itself. Хотеть + imperf is like some emotional itching, where your imagination pictures the wanted process (either activity or a continuous state) as is.
    Хотеть + perf is about what you want to achieve.

    Mmm yes, I think I understand... nevertheless in this particular sentence 'Не́сколько раз я хоте́л идти́/пойти́ с ним вме́сте до метро́.' the author is saying he wants to spend time walking to the metro station with the other person, so that (it seems to me) he's actually refering to the process of walking rather than the result (get to the metro). But maybe the presence of a clear destination (the metro) overrides my considerations; in the vast majority of cases if we say we want to "go to the metro" we mean we want to get there (result) rather than we want to walk up to that point for the sake of it, so that perfective is usually expected in this kind of structures.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    On a sidenote, "несколько раз я хотел что-л. делать" sounds a bit weird to me. "Мне хотелось" would be more suitable in this particular context - "я хотел" sounds too definite and purposeful for occasional desires to experience something.
    And "несколько раз я хотел что-л. сделать" will be normally interpreted as direct intents to accomplish something, not as mere wishes.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    nevertheless in this particular sentence 'Не́сколько раз я хоте́л идти́/пойти́ с ним вме́сте до метро́.' the author is saying he wants to spend time walking to the metro station with the other person, so that (it seems to me) he's actually refering to the process of walking rather than the result (get to the metro). But maybe the presence of a clear destination (the metro) overrides my considerations; in the vast majority of cases if we say we want to "go to the metro" we mean we want to get there (result) rather than we want to walk up to that point for the sake of it, so that perfective is usually expected in this kind of structures.
    As for separate (non-stacking) predicates as this particular one, it is possible for some verbs as идти when it is meant that you were 'going to go to'. In addition, the speaker is trying here to provide the sense that they aren't going to enter the metro, only to walk until they reach it and then say goodbye, so they use the preposition до. This phrase is rather informal; this is one of many situations when the language lacks a perfect consistent formal pattern, formally it should be something like "пройтись/прогуляться вместе с ним до метро; "проводить его до метро" - but, in this case the sense of 'going to walk' is lost because the perfective brings completion into focus.

    I agree with Awwal about я хотел/мне хотелось:
    Я сидел взаперти, время шло медленно, (несколько раз) мне хотелось курить.

    You can use хотел if you provide an adverbial to mark that it is not an intent but an internal feeling:
    Я сидел взаперти, время шло медленно, (несколько раз) я ужасно хотел курить.
    (ужасно хотелось is still more natural for the 'несколько раз' case - as it excludes any semantics of intent + potential completion which appears due to that 'several times').

    A perfective in this context would, for each particular frame, insert a sense of intent to perform a single transition into it :

    Я сидел взаперти, время шло медленно, несколько раз мне хотелось покурить/закурить, я уже доставал сигареты - но приходил охранник и говорил - "только попробуй, сукин сын".

    Here, the point is an intent to perform a unique act, a single transition: either to perform one smoking session, to have a smoke, - покурить, or, to lighten a cig, to start smoking - закурить.
     
    Last edited:

    Lorenc

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ok, here are the last two sentences from my short story. I'll also quote the sentences immediately preceding the one I'm interested in to give some context.

    — Кто предложи́л внедри́ть э́ту фу́нкцию?
    Мне хоте́лось сказа́ть:
    — Я! Э́то сде́лал я!
    Но ребя́та могли́ [поду́мать|ду́мать], что я вы́скочка. Тогда́ у меня́ бу́дут плохи́е отноше́ния с кома́ндой.

    I think this may be a case of a 'single transition between states' mentioned by nizzebro: people can pass from the state of not thinking anything in particular to thinking the author is a careerist. Saying the sentence 'это сделал я!' would trigger the transition.

    Last sentence:
    Я приглаша́ю вас в о́фис основа́теля компа́нии. Мы расска́зывали ему́ о ва́шей рабо́те. Он ви́дел все приложе́ния и прое́кты. Он уже́ сде́лал вы́бор и гото́в [объяви́ть|объявля́ть] его́. Дава́йте подни́мемся наве́рх.

    "and he is ready to announce it". It seems to me that both aspects are possible, depending on whether one wants to emphasise the result (perfective, and probably the more natural choice) or the process of announcement (imperfective). What do you think?
     
    Last edited:

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    — Кто предложи́л внедри́ть э́ту фу́нкцию?
    Мне хоте́лось сказа́ть:
    — Я! Э́то сде́лал я!
    Но ребя́та могли́ [поду́мать|ду́мать], что я вы́скочка. Тогда́ у меня́ бу́дут плохи́е отноше́ния с кома́ндой.
    :tick:

    Я приглаша́ю вас в о́фис основа́теля компа́нии. Мы расска́зывали ему́ о ва́шей рабо́те. Он ви́дел все приложе́ния и прое́кты. Он уже́ сде́лал вы́бор и гото́в [объяви́ть|объявля́ть] его́. Дава́йте подни́мемся наве́рх.
    :cross:
    The extract is quite odd. See below:

    Я приглаша́ю вас в о́фис основа́теля компа́нии (this part sounds pretty odd but ok, let it be)o_O.
    Мы расска́зывали ему́ о ва́шей рабо́те :tick:.
    Он ви́дел все приложе́ния и прое́кты :tick:.
    Он уже́ сде́лал вы́бор и гото́в [объяви́ть :tick:|объявля́ть :cross:] его́ (but the sentence is a bit odd as well). :tick:
    Дава́йте подни́мемся наве́рх (again odd) o_O
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Но ребя́та могли́ [поду́мать|ду́мать], что я вы́скочка.
    "Могли подумать", of course (to come to the conclusion as a result). "Могли думать" would imply that they already might have been thinking that, without any relation to the admission.

    Тогда́ у меня́ бу́дут плохи́е отноше́ния с кома́ндой.
    On a sidenote: you were speaking in the past tense, which makes the sudden future tense to sound very awkward. You rather need some form of the subjunctive mood here ("тогда у меня были бы плохие отношения с командой", or "тогда у меня ухудшились бы отношения с командой", or something along those lines), or just a past modal verb ("тогда у меня могли ухудшиться отношения с командой"), or a modal verb in the subjunctive mood.

    It seems to be both aspect are possible, depending on whether one wants to emphasise the result (perfective, and probably the more natural choice) or the process of announcement (imperfective). What do you think?
    In principle, they are, although by default I'd use perfective.
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    On a sidenote: you were speaking in the past tense, which makes the sudden future tense to sound very awkward. You rather need some form of the subjunctive mood here ("тогда у меня были бы плохие отношения с командой", or "тогда у меня ухудшились бы отношения с командой", or something along those lines), or just a past modal verb ("тогда у меня могли ухудшиться отношения с командой").
    :thumbsup:
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Но ребя́та могли́ [поду́мать|ду́мать], что я вы́скочка. Тогда́ у меня́ бу́дут плохи́е отноше́ния с кома́ндой.
    Подумать.
    Могли думать is not an option. It might be used in a context where it means 'to have an idea during some period' like "Трудно теперь сказать, как было на самом деле, Ватсон. Они могли думать, что мы ещё не знаем о том, что..." (not a citation but my invention) - or, in the present tense - "Вы можете думать (о нём) что угодно, но он честный гражданин". (cf. "Вы, конечно, можете/могли сейчас подумать: "Но как же так! Ведь он честный гражданин!", но скоро вы убедитесь - он преступник.") - note again some slight variations in the modal function of мочь.

    (As Awwal already noted, "... были бы плохи́е отноше́ния с кома́ндой.)

    Я приглаша́ю вас в о́фис основа́теля компа́нии. Мы расска́зывали ему́ о ва́шей рабо́те. Он ви́дел все приложе́ния и прое́кты. Он уже́ сде́лал вы́бор и гото́в [объяви́ть|объявля́ть] его́. Дава́йте подни́мемся наве́рх.

    "and he is ready to announce it". It seems to be both aspect are possible, depending on whether one wants to emphasise the result (perfective, and probably the more natural choice) or the process of announcement (imperfective). What do you think?
    Firstly, I'd rather expect the perfective "Мы расска́зали ему́ о ва́шей рабо́те" since the situation here implies a summation.
    "Мы расска́зывали..." is about the process only; it could sound as if not everything had been told, or he stopped them. It is fine only as a retrospection, when they tell somebody about this interview on the next day after that.
    As for "объяви́ть|объявля́ть", the perfective is the natural option to me - because someone's choice is not a process - it is a single point; but often the imperfective could be used as well as 'готов начать "- but, in this case I would probably feel as if the message potentially encapsulates some semi-sarcastic sense e.g. as if their boss always tends to long explanations - or, if he is waiting already for a long time until they, at last, gather together; but maybe I'm a bit sensitive though.


    One illustration that could help about retrospective vs summation. A father took his children to the city park, while their mummy stayed at home; they came back and she wants them to tell what they were doing there.
    Дети: "Там было так классно, мама! Мы катались на карусели, ели мороженое, кормили бегемотов".
    Отец: "Всё прошло хорошо, дорогая. Мы покатались на карусели, съели по две порции мороженого - больше я им не покупал, покормили бегемотов... Так, ну, вроде бы, всё."
     
    Last edited:
    Top