Ass happy

Poland91pl

Senior Member
Polish
Hello is it a new trend to use "ass" before some adjectives ? What do they add to the meaning?

How was your test?
Oh it was ass good

What did you feel when you won ?
Oh I was ass happy
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Where did you come across this usage, Poland91pl? Can you give us source and context, please?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry, "on the internet" doesn't really tell us much, Poland91. What was the situation? Who was speaking? What were they talking about? Who were they talking to? What was the exact sentence, and what were the sentences before and after (up to a total of four sentences)?
     

    Poland91pl

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Sorry, "on the internet" doesn't really tell us much, Poland91. What was the situation? Who was speaking? What were they talking about? Who were they talking to? What was the exact sentence, and what were the sentences before and after (up to a total of four sentences)?
    one example could be
    Ariana Grande wrote on her Instagram as a photo description " hope you have a restful ass, happy ass holiday, iight I'm done for now "
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I would read that as a restful-ass holiday/happy-ass holiday, rather than as an ass-happy holiday.

    Others will be better placed than I am to explain the nuances, though:).
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    one example could be
    Ariana Grande wrote on her Instagram as a photo description " hope you have a restful ass, happy ass holiday, iight I'm done for now "
    This could be regarded as fitting definitions #2 & #3 of "-ass" on Urban Dictionary:
    Suffix added to adjectives and participles to intensify their meaning: by extention, these words may used as abstract nouns.
    A suffix that can be added to most descriptive words.


    It's not a usage I'm particularly familiar with, but it may well be an AE usage.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I would be surprised to hear anyone over the age of 25 (or under the age of 12) in the US say "have a happy-ass holiday" in a non-ironic way, or even to say it at all.
    As others have commented, Urban Dictionary is a great resource to find out what people who use a lot of current slang are saying. It's not a place to go to learn regular ordinary American English, appropriate for all occasions, that most people who are between the ages of 14 months and 104 years would understand.

    This reminds me of a sandwich shop in New Jersey that I went to decades ago. The store had a display of porn novels for sale in a rack that one had to stand next to while waiting in line to order a hoagie. Little kids and grown men and all women ignored them completely. The only people who paid any attention to the silly punning titles and black-and-white drawings on the covers were males between the ages of 12 and 18 (and of course me, a grown woman laughing at the titles).
     
    Last edited:

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    There's also the merry fucking Christmas thread where it's pointed out that in casual, vulgar, or angry speech, English speakers will throw in obscenities in the middle of the sentence for emphasis. This can be considered really witty if you are 13.

    As in the case here, the resulting sentences tend to be unique constructions. Note that entertainers who work in linguistically creative fields (especially music and comedy) will sometimes invent expressions and even words in both their performances and their social communication. Sometimes these words enter popular usage and sometimes they don't.

    Now I see her actual quote was happy ass. That means nothing much besides happy

    [Side comment removed. DonnyB - moderator]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I would be surprised to hear anyone over the age of 25 (or under the age of 12) in the US say "have a happy-ass holiday" in a non-ironic way, or even to say it at all.
    This usage is entirely familiar to me, and I’m not between the ages of 12 and 25. “-ass” is a productive intensifier than can be added to pretty much any adjective, and it need not be ironic.

    Examples:
    He’s a greedy-ass mother fucker.
    That was a cheap-ass meal.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    This usage is entirely familiar to me, and I’m not between the ages of 12 and 25. “-ass” is a productive intensifier than can be added to pretty much any adjective, and it need not be ironic.

    Examples:
    He’s a greedy-ass mother fucker.
    That was a cheap-ass meal.
    I was unclear. "Have a happy-ass holiday" is specifically what I doubted people under 12 or over 25 would say. I wouldn't be surprised to hear "He's a greedy-ass muthafucka" from the mouth of anyone of any age who understands the difference between 'polite' and 'vulgar' speech and can switch from one to the other as the situation requires.
     

    Poland91pl

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was unclear. "Have a happy-ass holiday" is specifically what I doubted people under 12 or over 25 would say. I wouldn't be surprised to hear "He's a greedy-ass muthafucka" from the mouth of anyone of any age who understands the difference between 'polite' and 'vulgar' speech and can switch from one to the other as the situation requires.
    Why is that ? Why could you hear "greedyass" whatever the age and "happyass " only from people aged 12-25?;)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Because 'happy-ass holidays' sounds to my ears (which have been hearing things for much, much longer than 25 years) like an example of overuse of the 'adjective + ass' construction, and from my limited (or, as some might say, limited-ass) current research, Americans when they are older than 25 or so begin to reduce their heavy use of Urban Dictionary-type slang.
    Of course I could easily be wrong. This is based on my close sociological observations of young people, where my sample size = approximately 10. :)

    Note that I think 'greedy-ass' and 'happy-ass' should be hyphenated.
     

    Poland91pl

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Because 'happy-ass holidays' sounds to my ears (which have been hearing things for much, much longer than 25 years) like an example of overuse of the 'adjective + ass' construction, and from my limited (or, as some might say, limited-ass) current research, Americans when they are older than 25 or so begin to reduce their heavy use of Urban Dictionary-type slang.
    Of course I could easily be wrong. This is based on my close sociological observations of young people, where my sample size = approximately 10. :)

    Note that I think 'greedy-ass' and 'happy-ass' should be hyphenated.
    But they're all adjectives ? What about " dumbass "?
     
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