Assess personality and readiness and target clients...

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Marsario

Senior Member
Italia, italiano
Hello,

This is the sentence:

ASSESS PERSONALITY AND DIGITAL READINESS AND TARGET CLIENTS ACCORDING TO THEIR BELIEFS AND NEEDS

The first "and" connects the two objects, the second "and" connects the two phrases. Is this sentence correct, or is it better to replace one of the two "ands" with a comma?

More generally, can I use two "ands" in the same sentence if their function is different?

Thank you,
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, it's correct. You can have as many as you need. A comma after 'readiness' (keeping the 'and' after it) would make it clearer, but is not needed.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Use all the "ands" you want. Using "and" puts more emphasis on the combination that does commas.

    She was beautiful and smart and athletic and personable and all the things I would want in a girlfriend; unfortunately she hated my guts.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    But Packard, although your example uses four 'and's, they are all of the same type (they all connect your girlfriend's attributes). The OP is concerned with mixing the two types in a sentence.
    The OP sentence contains two imperative clauses; the first, "Assess X and Y", uses 'and' to join objects of the verb 'assess'; the second is "target clients". These two imperative clauses are connected with a different type of "and". There is no real basis for distinguishing these types; but the OP seems to be worried about a potential mix-up where "X and Y and Z" might make Z seem (at first reading) to be a third item in the list.

    But yes, this is perfectly fine, provided the meaning is reasonably clear.
    I agree with ETB's assessment that an optional comma might help, but the added comma should not replace the second 'and'.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    But Packard, although your example uses four 'and's, they are all of the same type (they all connect your girlfriend's attributes). The OP is concerned with mixing the two types in a sentence.
    The OP sentence contains two imperative clauses; the first, "Assess X and Y", uses 'and' to join objects of the verb 'assess'; the second is "target clients". These two imperative clauses are connected with a different type of "and". There is no real basis for distinguishing these types; but the OP seems to be worried about a potential mix-up where "X and Y and Z" might make Z seem (at first reading) to be a third item in the list.

    But yes, this is perfectly fine, provided the meaning is reasonably clear.
    I agree with ETB's assessment that an optional comma might help, but the added comma should not replace the second 'and'.
    I probably would have replaced the second "and" with "plus".


    ASSESS PERSONALITY AND DIGITAL READINESS AND PLUS TARGET CLIENTS ACCORDING TO THEIR BELIEFS AND NEEDS
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thank you Entangledbank, Packard and Edimburgher for the nice insights and suggestions!
    You are welcome.

    "Perceptive" pairs better with "insights" than does "nice". I would leave off any adjective or choose another one that is better suited than "nice".
     
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