asset fields

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ED1

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hello,

Can someone help me understand what the author may mean with «asset fields»? Thank you.

Global landscapes today are strewn with this kind of ruin. Still, these places can be lively despite announcements of their death; abandoned asset fields sometimes yield new multispecies and multicultural life.

Anna Tsing, The Mushroom at the End of the World
 
  • Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I assume that if you continue reading that the author will give examples. Usually the answer to unusual phrases like this is contained in the same text.

    This is a new phrase to me but just in the context given I am assuming the author will be discussing the environmental devastation left by strip mining, logging, and things like the oil sands extraction in Canada. These are physical areas stripped of marketable natural assets or resources.

    Google shows the term used for investment analysis which is a totally different meaning.

    Here are images of the oil sands extraction in Northern Canada.

    alberta oil sands - Google Search
     

    ED1

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    It's a quotation of a text i'm working on, but I'm looking at the original book and indeed the word asset it's used quite often. One example:

    «When its singular asset can no longer be produced, a place can be abandoned.»

    Still, i'm having problems understanding it's full meaning in the sentence and, more than that, i'm not being able to translate it correctly to my own language. But i'll figure it out. Thank you!
     

    ED1

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Before the sentence, the author writes:

    «The dream of alienation inspires landscape modification in which only one stand-alone asset matters; everything else becomes weeds or waste. Here, attending to living-space entanglements seems inefficient, and perhaps archaic. When its singular asset can no longer be produced, a place can be abandoned. The timber has been cut; the oil has run out; the plantation soil no longer supports crops.»
     
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