assiette remplie à ras-bord

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Syagrius, Mar 4, 2015.

  1. Syagrius

    Syagrius Senior Member

    Montréal, Québec, Canada.
    Français. Québec¸Canada.
    Bonsoir,

    On parle d'une assiette de nourriture.

    Comment dit-on "une assiette remplie à ras-bord" en anglais svp?

    A plate full to the brim?

    Vos réponses svp.

    Merci et bonne soirée.
     
  2. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    A plate filled to the brim.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  3. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    The idea of a plate 'filled to the brim' sounds odd to me. Most plates are filled to above the brim (even if they don't have much food on them). A bowl filled to the brim would be another matter.. If I wanted to talk about a plate with a lot of food on it I would say 'piled high'.
     
  4. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    I don't think a plate has a "brim" -- that is the top edge of a cup or bowl: He poured the coffee right up to the brim.

    A plate piled high is how I would say this in English.
     
  5. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    On second thought, I have to agree with Broglet and Wildan.
    Filled to the brim is usually used for glasses, cups, or bowls,
    not plates, which are flat.

    Interestingly enough, I did just find several examples of a plate filled to the brim,
    mostly on books.google.com. I have to admit, though, that I'm not familiar with
    any of the authors.
     
  6. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    France
    French - France, ♀
    Plates are not that flat. :) (assiette plate ; assiette creuse) And don't they have brims (the part that can be decorated) ?

    Sygarious can literally mean that the liquid or solid food is level with the brim of the plate.

    Comment dites-vous pour une assiette de soupe, dont le contenu arrive textuellement au ras du bord ?
     
  7. AlistairCookie Senior Member

    Xandria, Virginia
    English - U.S.
    Filled to the top (soup bowl)
    overflowing (plate)

    So much on the plate you couldn't put any more.
     
  8. Berkeleygirl Senior Member

    English - American
    It doesn't create as beautiful an image, but you can also say "a full plate," which gave rise to the expression, "I got a full plate," meaning I'm really busy.
     
  9. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    Une assiette creuse is a bowl in English--in our minds it has nothing to do with a plate.

    A bowl can have a brim -- not a plate.
     
  10. Mauricet Senior Member

    near Grenoble
    French - France
    Reverso donne soup plate pour assiette à soupe, qui est synonyme d'assiette creuse en français. Est-ce vraiment a bowl ??
     
  11. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    A soup plate is only one kind of bowl--sort of flat. I see them more in France than in the US, where soup is usually in a rounder, deeper type of pottery. But even one of those flatter type bowls ("soup plates") can be filled to the brim.
     
  12. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    :tick:I agree.
    From Wikipedia:
    A plate is composed of:

    • The well, the bottom of the plate, where food is placed.
    • The lip, the outer edge of the plate (sometimes falsely called rim). It can be flat (like a pizza plate); or inverted (slanting down); or everted (more common, slanting up).
    • The rim, which is actually the lip seen in profile—the opening of the vessel; sometimes with a gilded line.
    • The base, which is sometimes used interchangeably with "well", but actually refers to the underside.
    The WR dictionary gives both "soup plate" and "bowl" for assiette creuse."
    assiette creuse nf soup plate
    assiette creuse nf (soup bowl) bowl


    I have to say that I have never used, nor would I ever think to use, "soup plate."
    Perhaps it is more BE...?:rolleyes:
    In the U.S., soup is served either in a cup or a bowl.
    In fact, in restaurants when you order soup, you are often asked:
    A cup (i.e., a smaller portion) or a bowl (a larger portion)?

    See these two other threads:
    assiette creuse
    plat/assiette
     
  13. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    France
    French - France, ♀
    :eek: "The rim is actually the lip seen in profile" est bien compliqué. J'avoue surtout ne pas bien comprendre ce qui, hormis leur fond appelé well, est plat dans les assiettes à pizza (en voilà dont le bord est surélevé), mais passons.

    Voici tout un assortiment d'assiettes avec images et légendes (la page est hébergée au Royaume Uni). On y lit "Wide Rim Pasta Plates" et "Traditional Pasta & Soup Plates" pour ce qu'on appelle ici des assietes creuses.
    Le rebord d'une assiette (sa partie périphérique en saillie, parfois décorée, sur laquelle on ne pose pas les aliments qu'on mange ; éventuellement un morceau de pain), s'appelleraitrim quand il est plat et wing quand il est incliné (parce que le rebord profilé "s'envole", rebique ?).


    Je retiens en tout cas filled to the top proposé par AlistairCookie. :)
     
  14. lone elm

    lone elm Senior Member

    Ontario, Canada
    English - Canadian
    All technical and tedious arguments aside "filled or full to the brim" is a wonderfully colourful, and idiomatic expression that can be used figuratively, creatively, playfully or metaphorically in many contexts including bowls, plates, dishes, cups, a meeting hall, agendas, one's day, or whatever to mean "darn full"!
     
  15. Syagrius

    Syagrius Senior Member

    Montréal, Québec, Canada.
    Français. Québec¸Canada.
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2015
  16. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    I think the previous suggestions of "piled high"
    perfectly describe the plate in the picture.

    Do you have a complete sentence you plan to use it in?
     
  17. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)

    A wheel or plate can have a rim--that is the outer edge.

    Some messages above mix up rim with brim. A plate or wheel can have a rim--that is the outer edge.

    Only something deep -- glass, bowl, bucket, etc. can be filled to the brim. (Brim is not a word used alone--it always goes with the set expression filled (up) to the brim)
     

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