assist someone to do/in doing something

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,

From the dictionary I've learnt that two sentence patterns can be used with "assist":

1) assist someone to do something
2) assist someone in doing something

Are they interchangeable, or is one pattern better than the other in certain contexts?

My example is this:
Here at Company ABC, we are pleased to assist you to find/in finding your dream job!

Many thanks!
 
  • pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I can only comment on your example "Here at Company ABC, we are pleased to assist you to find/in finding your dream job!" because numbers one and two have no context. Context will make either one correct.
    As for Here at Company ABC, we are pleased to assist you to find/in finding your dream job! in finding is correct in this context.
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    1) assist someone to do something :thumbsdown:
    1) help someone [to] do something :thumbsup:

    2) assist someone in doing something :tick:
    But MacMillan Dictionary gives this entry:

    to make a job or piece of work easier to do

    assist someone to do something: The scheme assists young people to find work.

    I understand dictionaries sometimes include usages that aren't common; I'd just like to check if it's used at all.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Of course, it’s not wrong, hence the thumbs-down rather than a cross. But it’s less common than help + bare infinitive, and to my ears less natural-sounding. The Macmillan example is okay as a formal statement, but I would much prefer a gerund version: The scheme assists young people in finding work (as would pops, judging by #3). And on a more everyday level:

    Would you assist me to do this, please? :thumbsdown: · Would you help me do this, please? :thumbsup:
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Of course, it’s not wrong, hence the thumbs-down rather than a cross. But it’s less common than help + bare infinitive, and to my ears less natural-sounding. The Macmillan example is okay as a formal statement, but I would much prefer a gerund version: The scheme assists young people in finding work (as would pops, judging by #3). And on a more everyday level:

    Would you assist me to do this, please? :thumbsdown: · Would you help me do this, please? :thumbsup:
    Thank you very much for your clarification! :)
     
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