assuring him that she made no account whatever of his

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 24

Quotation: “But what has mademoiselle to do with it? I don’t care for the fairy: you said it was mademoiselle you would take to the moon?”

“Mademoiselle is a fairy,” he said, whispering mysteriously. Whereupon I told her not to mind his badinage; and she, on her part, evinced a fund of genuine French skepticism: denominating Mr. Rochester “un vrai menteur,” and assuring him that she made no account whatever of his “contes de fée,” and that “du reste, il n’y avait pas de fées, et quand même il y en avait:” she was sure they would never appear to him, nor ever give him rings, or offer to live with him in the moon.

Context: Mr. R said he would share the life with mademoiselle (Jane) on the moon: for a fairy offered to go with him out of the common word to live together there. Then Adele asked...

contes de fée =>Fairy tales (according to Google translation)
du reste, il n’y avait pas de fées, et quand même il y en avait => however, there were no fairies, and still there were (according to Google translation)
===
Hi everyone! i don't quite understand the bold part. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

to assure => 4 : to inform positively <I assure you that we can do it>
account => 7 a : careful thought : CONSIDERATION
account whatever => account (consideration) of any kind at all

the whole sentence => ...informing him positively that she didn't take his fair tales seriously at all
 
  • Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    Yes, you got it all right :thumbsup: She didn't believe a single word he said about the so-called "fairies" and doesn't even believe in their existence.
     
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