Asturiano: ye

Yul

Senior Member
Canada, French
"El sarampión ye una enfermedá infeiciosa exantemática como la rubeola o la varicela, abondo frecuente, especialmente en niños, causada por un virus..."

Comment expliquer ce "ye"?

Merci. Yul
 
  • Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Effectivement, ye veut dire "est", autant en asturien qu'en aragonais, qui sont deux langues romanes, pas de dialectes.
     

    Yul

    Senior Member
    Canada, French
    Suis content d'avoir posé ma question et content des réponses reçues.
    Merci.
    Yul
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    It's similar in use and meaning to the Corsican "ghjè" (also identical pronunciation of "ye"), cognate also of Italian "c'è" (ci + è = there is), while in Sardinian we use "ch'est" (che + est, abbreviation of Latin "hicce est" = there is), or "b'est" (bi + est, abbreviation of Latin "ibi est" = there is).
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    If I may compare Asturian "ye" with Castilian "es":
    Both forms are derived from Latin "est", and both regularly lost the final "t".
    The diphthong of Asturian, versus the lack of a diphthong in Castilian
    is explained* as a result of derivations from stressed versus unstressed versions of "est", respectively.
    The loss of "s"—which also occurred in Galician and Portuguese, in both of which the form is simply "é"—is more difficult to explain. Neither Asturian, nor Galician, nor Portuguese deletes final "s" in other words.
    --------
    *For example by Alonso Zamora Vicente, Dialectología española, p. 96.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    The loss of "s"—which also occurred in Galician and Portuguese, in both of which the form is simply "é"—is more difficult to explain. Neither Asturian, nor Galician, nor Portuguese deletes final "s" in other words.
    I can't really speak for Asturian, but regarding the Aragonese ye, the medieval form in written texts was in fact yes*. This -and what you state about the non-deletion of final -s, which does not happen in Aragonese either, makes me suspect that it could be a case of avoiding confusion with the second singular form, which is also yes (tu yes). If I recall it right, that second form is also yes in Asturian.

    *But get in the Glosas Emilianenses.
     
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