"at 22" with a "hand" fluted cylinder

prudent260

Senior Member
Chinese
<-----Video clip removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Here is a transcript of a part of a pilot speech:

I am packing a Colt King Cobra that’s a 357 caliber firearm with a black rubber grip and a 6 inch barrel. Also the copilot is carrying a Kimber custom defense pistol with all the bells and whistles you’d expect from a custom gun of that kind with an alloy frame and bevel treatment on the entire gun. And our chief attendant has a Ruger Bearcat at 22 with a hand fluted cylinder.

I don't understand what "at 22" mean.
I know whtt "a fluted cylinder" is after having looked it up but can't figure out why "hand" was placed there.

Can anyone help? Thank you
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I assume, rightly or wrongly, that the chief attendant is 22 of age.
    I assume, further, that the cylinder is hand-fluted, i.e. - the fluting is hand-made.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm thinking the 22 is the caliber of the chief attendant's handgun – to match the 357 that was mentioned by the pilot regarding his own gun.

    I agree about the fluting.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    "At 22" means it is .22 calibre (compare with the earlier mentioned gun, with a .357 calibre), and the cylinder is "hand-fluted", i.e. it was made by hand (and therefore custom/unique/specially-made, rather than being mass produced by a machine).
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I assume, rightly or wrongly, that the chief attendant is 22 of age.
    This seems unlikely. A Ruger Bearcat 22 is a revolver. It's more likely that "at" is a transcription of a hesitation on the speaker's part, or a mis-hearing of something like "a Ruger Bearcat -- that 22 with..."
     
    Last edited:

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Ah, sure, makes sense - 22 is the calibre. We usually describe the ammunition in mm and I suppose this calibre description (0.22) is not metric. Now that I calculate, it corresponds exactly to our 5.6 mm calibre. But I am not an expert. :) Still, it did sound like the fellow was 22 years old. :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Actually, it's transcribed correctly, and I take it to mean "a Ruger Bearcat at 22 (caliber) with ..."

    As a note, the Ruger Bearcat is chambered for a .22 LR (Long Rifle) cartridge ... which is very unimpressive for shooting and stopping people. (Wikipedia link)

    Added: Yes, it's 5.6mm ... the .22 caliber is very popular in the US, and a .22 rifle or pistol will often be young people's first firearm. From that article above: Because of its compact size and frame, it is advertised as being ideal for hikers or campers in need of a .22 LR revolver, or "kit gun".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    This revolver's cylinder has no flutes:



    This revolver has flutes:



    The fluting reduces weight. I would assume that the standard version of this weapon has no flutes and it was machined after production by a gunsmith.

    This .357 has no flutes to improve the strength of he cylinder. The eight shot spacing weakens the cylinder so no fluting is provided.



    Here is an image of a Ruger Bearcat revolver with hand engraving where the fluting would normally be:

     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Some of the information in that text is accurate and some is highly inventive. The sentence that follows the above is of that latter category:

    All three are capable of piercing body armor at a distance of up to twenty-seven feet and you can put a hole in human bone and flesh the size of the Grand Canyon, which by the way is coming up on the left hand side of the plane, so just sit back, relax, and enjoy the rest of your flight..."

    These are lyrics to a song so credible information may not be part of the intent by the writer.

    Yasiin Bey – The Embassy Lyrics | Genius Lyrics
     

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I am amazed at the responses, and they come with new items of vocabulary.
    Thank everyone for the answers and Packard and Copyright for the further information.

    On the Internet, the chamber diameter is rarely described with “at 22.”

    the .22 caliber is very popular in the US, and a .22 rifle or pistol will often be young people's first firearm
    As Copyright pointed out that a .22 caliber pistol is often the first firearm for young people, did the pilot make a pun to indicate the caliber of the pistol and the flight attendant’s age?

    <-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    On the Internet, the chamber diameter is rarely described with “at 22.”
    True, so I advise you not to use it this way.
    As Copyright pointed out that a .22 caliber pistol is often the first firearm for young people, did the pilot make a pun to indicate the caliber of the pistol and the flight attendant’s age?
    I don’t think so. I think that whoever wrote the script was just trying to sound cool and techy.

    “Hand-fluted” makes no difference in the operation of the pistol, and if there was a deliberate choice of caliber, it might be for a woman. A chief attendant – known to me as a senior flight attendant or purser, and usually a woman – would be someone with direct contact with passengers, and might just want to wound someone rather than kill them. And the "Ruger Bearcat" has an aggressive name, especially considering the small caliber, that sounds macho in the voiceover.

    But this is all just chat – it’s just a fun video and I wouldn’t bother trying to analyze it seriously.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    We seem to be working from differing sources. The quote I found was lyrics from a rapper’s song. What other source is there.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It was a video clip of a pilot talking to his passengers. Note “video” reference in the first line of the OP.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top