At 7 o'clock I have breakfast with some biscuits and a cup of tea.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by marcogaiotto, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. marcogaiotto Senior Member

    Italian
    At 7 o'clock I have breakfast with some biscuits and a cup of tea. (1)
    Can you still help me, please? Does this sentence sound natural?
    At 7 o'clock I have breakfast and I eat some biscuits and a cup of tea. (2)
    At 7 o'clock I breakfast on some biscuits and a cup of tea. (3)
    Are (2) and (3) better? Thanks a lot in advance!
     
  2. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    (1) sounds natural, (2) is correct, but sounds wordy and unnatural, and (3) sounds weird. We don't use 'breakfast' as a verb unless we are characters in a 19th century novel.
     
  3. marcogaiotto Senior Member

    Italian
    Thanks s lot, heypresto!
     
  4. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    Breakfast and biscuits and tea sounds rather self-indulgent for seven in the morning! My kind of breakfast.
     
  5. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    . . . except for the tea. It's the Devil's dishwater. :D
     
  6. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    Note, as se16teddy points out, that phrasing the sentence as " breakfast with some biscuits and a cup of tea" indicates that you are having the biscuits and the tea in addition to breakfast (which would be something else, such as eggs or oatmeal.)

    Also note that while "biscuits" as part of breakfast makes sense in both British English and American English, the word does not mean the same thing on both sides of the Atlantic.
    These are the sort of biscuits one might eat for (or with) breakfast in the USA:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. marcogaiotto Senior Member

    Italian
    GreenWhiteBlue....:D:D:D:D...marvellous images...but croissants look even better...:):):) Thank you so much for your suggestion!!!!
     
  8. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    This is an excellent example of how important context is. In the sentence "At 7 o'clock I have breakfast with my students," the word "with" has a totally different meaning!
     
  9. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    Well, Marc, you may well have what we call biscuits with breakfast but it certainly is not usual here and would be cause for comment. I suspect there's some 'false friendship' going on here.
     
  10. marcogaiotto Senior Member

    Italian
    Hermione, what do you mean by saying "biscuits", then? Are "Shortbread" or "cookies" ...more likely to be served for breakfast?
     
  11. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    No, what we call biscuits are called cookies in AmE. People don't usually eat them for breakfast.
     
  12. manfy Senior Member

    Singapore
    German - Austria
    Based on this version, I get the feeling that you're trying to say your breakfast consists of only some biscuits and tea.
    If so, I'd rephrase it to: "At 7 o'clock I (usually) have some biscuits and a cup of tea for breakfast."

    And this is not the same as version (1) "At 7 o'clock I have breakfast with some biscuits and a cup of tea" - as some other posts have already pointed out!!
     
  13. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    We usually have biscuits (the American version looks more interesting :D) with a cup of tea, so I'd put 'cup of tea' first. Depending on whether the breakfast consists only of, or is in addition to, breakfast (as GWB and manfy have pointed out), I would say:

    I have a cup of tea and some biscuits for breakfast at 7 o'clock.
    At 7 o'clock I have breakfast with a cup of tea and some biscuits.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
  14. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    According to Wikipedia:

    Italian breakfast (prima colazione) consists of caffè latte (hot coffee with milk) or coffee with bread or rolls, butter and jam. A cookie-like rusk hard bread, called fette biscottate, and cookies are commonly eaten. Children drink hot chocolate, plain milk, or hot milk with very little coffee. If breakfast is eaten in a bar (coffee shop), it is composed of cappuccino and cornetto (frothed hot milk with coffee and a pastry) or espresso and pastry.
     
  15. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima (English Only)

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You can also say: 'At 7 o'clock I have a breakfast of some biscuits and a cup of tea' if you want to say that that is your breakfast.
     
  16. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    The City of New York
    USA - English
    At the risk of wading into the waters of culture, rather than grammar, this is a full English breakfast:
    [​IMG]
    Marcogaiotto should note that the only baked goods in sight would be the greasy fried bread.

    These are substantial American breakfasts:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    You can see that there is a much larger variety of baked goods, including in the last image that Southern US favorite (utterly unknown in the north) of "biscuits and gravy", and in no case does an American breakfast include baked beans, which Americans find even less suited for breakfast (a euphemism; to be frank, Americans find the idea of beans for breakfast to be entirely weird) than cookies are.

    Nevertheless, the point is that 1) in the English-speaking world, a classic breakfast does not consist of coffee and something like biscotti, and 2) When English speakers on either side of the Atlantic say "biscuits", they are not thinking of biscotti.
     
  17. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English

    That's exactly what I meant by 'false friends': the word biscottate looks like our word 'biscuits', but they are clearly something very different.
    (Few people have a 'full English' these days, although some version of cooked breakfast like that is quite popular for lunch.)
    [​IMG]

    I like Garibaldis, Jaffa cakes, Fox's Ginger Cream Crunch, shortbread and dark chocolate digestives but we don't have them at home. And never at breakfast anywhere.
     
  18. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    It does also say that cookies are commonly eaten.

    This website also mentions 'coffee and biscuits':

    Italy: Eating in Italy, How Italians eat, Here's a quick guide on Italian eating habits

    Breakfast (7.00 – 11.00)

    This is always a light meal. May consist of a cappuccino or coffe & brioche (type of croissant) at a bar (often standing up) or coffee and biscuits and possibly a piece of fruit at home.The brioche can be plain ( liscia), filled with jam ( con marmellata) or confectioners custard ( con crema), even occasionally with chocolate ( con cioccolata).
     

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