At a friend's house, going to a friend's house

mark34

New Member
English
Hi everyone,

Merry Christmas! Am looking for some help.

I know phrases like "Ich bin bei meinen Eltern" but I don't know how to say "I am at Stuart's":

is it just something like "Ich bin bei Stuarts" ?

What about "I am going to Stuart's"? "Ich gehe nach Stuarts"?

Many thanks in advance,
Mark
 
  • ABBA Stanza

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    Great, thank you! Do you know why it's den rather than dem? I learnt bei and zu both always take dative, I guess I was taught wrong?
    No, you were taught correctly. You just happened to pick a name (Stuart) that can be mistaken for a surname, as appears to have been the case here. For example:

    I'm at Eric's = Ich bin bei(m) Eric.
    I'm at Sarah's = Ich bin bei (der) Sarah.


    However, it can get a bit confusing, because the German expression can mean different things depending on context. For example, whereas "I'm at Eric's" always means "I'm at Eric's home", "Ich bin beim Eric" can (in addition) also mean "I'm in Eric's office", or "I'm with Eric". So (and this is where I start getting confused myself) does

    "Ich bin zu Hause beim Eric"

    mean "I'm at Eric's home" or "I'm at (my) home with Eric"? :confused: I think it means the former, and that if the latter were intended, one would usually say "Ich bin zu Hause mit Eric". But I'm not 100% sure.

    Here's another similar example I found on the web (here):

    Ich war zu Hause bei den Kindern und mein Mann den ganzen Tag arbeiten.

    I find such sentences ambiguous without context. For example, it could mean that the wife was left at home looking after the children every day, whilst the husband was at work. But I think it could also be talking about a single day in the past where the wife was at her childrens' home and the husband was away working.

    Maybe a native can help both of us out here. :)

    Cheers,
    Abba
     

    mark34

    New Member
    English
    No, you were taught correctly. You just happened to pick a name (Stuart) that can be mistaken for a surname, as appears to have been the case here.
    Aha! I've been offline for a couple of days but been wandering around trying to work around why the (dative) plural was used! Thanks a lot for clearing that up.

    Maybe a native can help both of us out here. :)
    If no one pops up here I'll ask a native speaker when I next speak to one and let you know re "Ich bin zu Hause beim Eric" and variants.

    Cheers,
    Mark
     

    Savra

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    So (and this is where I start getting confused myself) does

    "Ich bin zu Hause beim Eric"

    mean "I'm at Eric's home" or "I'm at (my) home with Eric"? :confused: I think it means the former, and that if the latter were intended, one would usually say "Ich bin zu Hause mit Eric". But I'm not 100% sure.
    Ohne Kontext wäre ich ganz automatisch vom ersten ausgegangen, aber Du hast recht: die Bedeutung könnte theoretisch davon abhängen, wo sich Eric befindet. Es könnte sogar bedeuten: mein Platz ist an Erics Seite.

    So ganz gefällt mir die Formulierung aber nicht, obwohl sie nicht falsch ist. Ich hätte es wohl so gesagt:
    I’m at Eric’s home. = Ich bin bei Eric zu Hause. Ich bin bei Erics Zuhause. Ich bin bei Eric.

    I’m at (my) home with Eric. = Ich bin zu Hause mit Eric. Ich bin bei mir mit Eric. Ich bin bei mir zu Hause mit Eric. Ich bin mit Eric zu Hause.

    Eigentlich finde ich das schon recht eindeutig.

    Ich war zu Hause bei den Kindern und mein Mann den ganzen Tag arbeiten.

    I find such sentences ambiguous without context. For example, it could mean that the wife was left at home looking after the children every day, whilst the husband was at work. But I think it could also be talking about a single day in the past where the wife was at her childrens' home and the husband was away working.
    Ja, es könnte beides bedeuten. Etwas klarer ist es auch hier mit „bei“ und „mit“. Vermutlich würde man es aber ganz anders sagen.
    1) Ich blieb zu Hause, bei den Kindern, während mein Mann den ganzen Tag arbeitete.
    2) Ich ging zu den Kindern, und mein Mann arbeitete den ganzen Tag.
     
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