At a pit stop a day's journey

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
At a pit stop a day's journey from Caracas, they discussed their prospects.
(Jon Lee Anderson; Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life)

It seems to me like there's something missing, is there?

Thanks.
 
  • GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    Personally I don't think so, because the "a days journey" refers to the fact that they are a day away from Caracas and doesn't refer to the pit stop, the only thing that I might add is a comma after "pit stop" to make the middle section a subordinate clause:

    At a pit stop, a day's journey from Caracas, they discussed their prospects.

    I hope this helps :)
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Or does it simply mean 'they stopped and there was one day left till they would get to Caracas'?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I can't see anything missing here, SuprunP. They were somewhere where they made a pit stop and discussed their prospects. Anderson could have mentioned where they were when they made the pit stop, but he didn't. I don't think it's necessary. Let's see what others think. What do you think is missing?
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Thank you GMF1991 and owlman5!

    I've just noticed what I initially missed :) Quite a silly oversight.
     
    Last edited:

    GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    Or does it simply mean 'they stopped and there was one day left till they would get to Caracas'?
    That could also be true, however I was unsure whether they were travelling to or from Caracas...

    Either way, I don't think anything is strictly needed for this sentence, what I said was merely a suggestion;
    :)
     
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