at a premium

Jo-Jo

Member
Español/España
Hello!,

I would like alternatives to the bold words that still make sense in the sentences provided:
  • There seems to be no thought of calories or nutrition or even, from what I have observed, conversation.
  • I am also mad at myself that fast food is in my life whether I want it to be or not.
  • My life is as hectic as everyone else’s and with time at a premium, every now and the fast food looks,…
Thank you,
 
  • T.D-K

    Senior Member
    Cymraeg Cymru
    Usually used with reference to a scarce resource such as time in a busy or hectic life when you have better things to do with your time.

    "of high value (usually because of scarcity) or above par value;"

    wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hola Jo-Jo,

    Try any good dictionary. You will find the phrase "at a premium" means scarce or uncommon, and therefor more costly or valuable.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    At a premium really only means more costly or valuable, and not necessarily scarce or uncommon.

    Often the "premium" is due simply to the higher cost to produce it in terms of labor.

    A base model truck is $x, and the XYZ package available at a premium. Of course, 80% of the trucks sold have the "premium" package, so its not at all uncommon.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Balderdash! You have been hoodwinked by the misuse of the word premium by the marketers.

    At a premium does mean of greater value, and that is due to scarcity. If I take a common commodity, double the price and name it "premium gizmo", that is a degradation and misuse of language. If the consumer doesn't put value at a premium, and is quick to swallow whatever is being peddled as of premium quality, that is a false inference.

    I also disagree with you statement about labor cost. In most manufacturing industry in the U.S., direct labor represents 10% or less of total manufacturing costs. The remainder is indirect labor allocations, materials, and overheads. Add to those the corporate O/H, and direct and indirect marketing, sales, and administrative costs, bad debt reserves, taxes, etc, and you get a more accurate picture.

    If the premium is <1% of the base price, it's still a premium, but that is not consistent with the example given in the thread question.


    nycphotography said:
    At a premium really only means more costly or valuable, and not necessarily scarce or uncommon.

    Often the "premium" is due simply to the higher cost to produce it in terms of labor.

    A base model truck is $x, and the XYZ package available at a premium. Of course, 80% of the trucks sold have the "premium" package, so its not at all uncommon.
     
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