at dawn of

runnery

Senior Member
China,Chinese
Hi there:

We are at dawn of the electrical car and our customer keep reducing consumption.

Could you please tell me what's the meaning of "at dawn of"? Is it equal to "become clear"?

Thanks a lot

Runnery
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    A day begins with dawn. Thus, the "dawn" of anything means its earliest beginnings:

    The trains built in the 1830's, at the dawn of railroads, did not look like the trains one sees today.
     

    AudreyH

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi! I have a similar question: which one(s) is/are correct among the following sentences?

    - "At dawn on a cold winter's day, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    - "On the dawn of a cold winter's day, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    - "On a cold winter's day, at dawn, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    - others...

    Thanks for your help!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    (1)- "At dawn on a cold winter's day, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    (2)- "On the dawn of a cold winter's day, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    (3)- "On a cold winter's day, at dawn, he followed his enemy as he walked to the church and killed him."
    - others...
    Either (1) or (3) will work, but not (2). :)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Well, your examples use the phrase literally, whereas the earlier poster was tying to use it figuratively.
    Only 1 and 3 work for.me.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top