At first you on a name

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Yaroslava

Senior Member
Russian
I'm at a crossroads, I cannot think of an idiom that can replace the Russian one. So the point is that we say that you work on a name first (you work to obtain the recognition to make people know your name), and afterwards the name works on you (after you are recognised, and you are known for your excellent performance, employers will hire you and see your talents easily, it's sort of a compensation for the hard work). So is there any idiom expressing this?
 
  • lordignus

    Senior Member
    British English
    So what you're trying to say is that hard work will be rewarded, or something like that?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I don't know an idiom for this. But the idea is well-known. Companies work hard to produce a "brand name" that is well-known and has a good reputation. Individual people do the same: becoming "well-known" or even "famous".

    Even the sons and daughters of famous people may "use" or "coast on" or "rely on" their famous name to get them benefits. Initially Paris Hilton was a "celebrity" only because she had a famous name (she was the daughter of the "Hilton" who owns a world-wide chain of "Hilton" hotels). She later became "a celebrity in her own right" based on her own actions.
     

    Yaroslava

    Senior Member
    Russian
    So may I say: "before your name will build your reputation, you have to work hard to build the name"? Is it close? A bit...
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    So may I say: "before your name will builds your reputation, you have to work hard to build the name"? Is it close? A bit...
    You may put it in many ways, but it will not be a fixed expression though.
    But it is Arshavin who has come in for the most criticism, particularly in Sovetsky Sport, whose columnist Yuri Tsybanev noted that "first you work for a name, then the name works for you", suggesting he is now being picked on reputation alone.
    Russia seem to be going backwards as the sun sets on 'golden age' | Jonathan Wilson
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    How about: "Before you name works for you, you have to work for your name"? (Although you might have to explain that to someone hearing it.)

    "Before your name works for you, you have to establish your name" might be more understandable, but it's less catchy that the one above.
     
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