at home and abroad

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Blue Apple

Senior Member
Persian (Iran)
Do "at home and abroad" and "artists on the home front; the third, overseas work" imply "British artists painting the war in England and those sent to the fronts in other countries to paint the war"?

Context:
The goal of the resulting War Artists Advisory Committee (WAAC) was ‘to draw up a list of artists qualified to record the war at home and abroad … [and] to advise on the selection of artists from this list for war purposes and on the arrangements for their employment’.1 The first part of this section explores Clark’s efforts at the WAAC, which helped transform British art; the second, artists on the home front; the third, overseas work (Art and War by Laura Brandon).
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The two sentences are completely separate. At home and abroad = in the UK and not in the UK

    The goal of the resulting War Artists Advisory Committee ... arrangements for their employment’. describes the aims of the WAAC.

    The first part of this section of this book explores Clark’s efforts at the WAAC, which helped transform British art;
    the second part of this section of this book explores, artists on the home front;
    the third part of this section of this book explores overseas work
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The first part makes no reference to British artists, and I would not be at all surprised if some of WAAC artists were not British. "At home" and "on the home front" both refer to in the UK (not necessarily England). "Abroad" and "overseas" both refer to outside the UK, but not necessarily to "fronts" as is usually understood in terms of war. The term "home front" appears to have been coined during the First World War to recognise and encourage the civilian effort needed to sustain the war.
     
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