at huge rate

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s21d

Senior Member
hindi
My hair is falling at huge rate.

Kindly tell me if the preposition 'at' fits in here and also if the phrase 'huge rate' go well with the sentence.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    No, it doesn't really work, I'm afraid. "At" might be correct, but there are other problems with your sentence. Can you explain a little more about what you're trying to say and in what situation you would say it? (For example, do you mean your hair is falling out?)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Despite its brevity, the sentence has two major errors:

    My hair is falling out at a huge rate.

    You need "out" otherwise is would mean, for instance, that your hair was on a table and falling to the floor.

    You need "a" because "rate" is a singular, countable noun, and all singular, countable nouns need a determiner to qualify them.

    At is fine...
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Rapid" or "great" collocate better with "rate". "At a huge rate" sounds just a little odd to me.

    My hair is falling out at a rapid rate.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Even allowing for hyperbole, hair falling out at a "huge rate" is something I couldn't say (and I've often needed to say something similar because it's a particular problem of my daughter's). "At an alarming rate" is what springs to mind.

    The Ngram for huge, great, alarming and rapid can be seen here:
    Google Ngram Viewer
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm... the Ngram surprised me as "a huge rate" sounds perfectly natural. Business growth always seems to be at "a huge rate."
     
    Last edited:

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    I don't think "falling out at a huge rate" is wrong, exactly, but I've been pondering why I don't like it much. Though this might be a bit picky, here's what I'm thinking:

    With "rate" it might be better style to apply an adjective which more clearly refers to speed, not to quantity. (It's not how much hair is falling out*, but how fast it is falling out.)

    I like "at a rapid rate" (velisarius' post #4), but other possible adjectives ("fast", "accelerated", "elevated") can be found here:
    RhymeZone: Adjectives for rate

    "At an alarming rate" sounds natural, of course, but it does introduce additional meaning. (We don't know whether or not the original poster intends to state that somebody is alarmed.)

    *Plus, "huge" seems exaggerated when applied to the limited quantity of hair on a single person's head. Or maybe that's just me.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    That looks like a very useful link, cubaMania. :thumbsup:

    I agree that speed is implied here. Given that "a huge rate" sounds like an exaggeration because, as you rightly say, the amount of hair is limited to start with, I thought that "alarming" tends also to hyperbole and so retains something of the enormity of "huge" :). "Alarming" is much more emotive, I agree, but people do tend to be sensitive about going bald.
     
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