...at/in their four-room flat...

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Karen123456

Senior Member
Malaysia English
The following is from a newspaper.

Mr Gorden Yeo was found with slash and stab wounds at their four-room flat in Senja Road on Monday.

Shouldn't it be 'in their four-room flat' instead?

Thanks.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It can be either. He was found at a location, he was found in a container. The flat can be perceived as either.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Prepositions are rather confounding for even native English speakers. It could be at or in here, but I would use "in." Still, the journalist might not have wanted to have "in" with "flat" and "in" with "Senja Road" – although I would use "on Senja Road." Of course, then you have "on" with "Senja Road" and "on" with "Monday." So at that point, you choose the best preposition for each case and don't worry about any minor repetition.

    Is this a Malaysian paper? We always like to see something more concrete than "a newspaper" so we can give you a good answer.
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Sorry about the incomplete information. It is from a newspaper in Singapore.

    I believe it should be "in". I was taught to use "in" when it is not an address. For example, I live in Senja Road, BUT I live at 123 Senja Road.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The problem with the English that students are taught in Asia is that most of the English teachers are not native speakers, so the preferences, peculiarities and mistakes of the past get passed along to the present and carried forward into the future. And students are understandably susceptible to the idea what what their teachers tell them is the absolute truth ... which is often not true.

    In this case, it can be in or at their four-room flat – I would use "in" simply because I can imagine someone finding the man inside the flat. As for "in Senja Road," I would say "on Senja Road," so prepositions are going to vary with people and varieties of English, although I agree with "at 123 Senja Road."
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Sorry about the incomplete information. It is from a newspaper in Singapore.

    I believe it should be "in". I was taught to use "in" when it is not an address. For example, I live in Senja Road, BUT I live at 123 Senja Road.
    What you are taught and what we actually do with langauge are not always going to align. Guidance from native speakers is taking you to a new level of learning.

    This dead body is not living anywhere. It was FOUND. You can be found AT a place or IN something, as Andy said in post number 2.
     
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