at its most anodyne

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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The word "anodyne" seems to fit the sentence, Inouez. It's just an efficient yet somewhat strange way to say that some program makes people forget about their pains, worries, or troubles. "TV at its most soporific" might have been more accurate.;)
     

    Bongone

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    As a noun, anodyne is a painkiller. Used as an adjective, it means bland, intellectually unchallenging, dull, boring or run-of-the-mill.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    WR's definition for that adjective differs a little from yours, Bongone. Anodyne

    I wouldn't be at all surprised to find the meaning you suggest in another dictionary, however. I would be surprised to find that "dull" is the only definition for the adjective in another dictionary.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I believe you, veli. Don't the Oxford dictionaries offer any definition for the adjective "anodyne" that means "soothing"? If not, I'm surprised.;)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I's the only definition that oxforddictionariesonline.com give. I don't have access to the big OED.
    Here's Cambridge Dictionary:


    intended to avoid causing offence or disagreement, especially by not expressing strong feelings or opinions:

    This is daytime television at its most anodyne.
    Somehow this avoids being just another silly pop song with anodyne lyrics about love and happiness
    .
    British usage seems to differ from the American here, by not including the "serving to alleviate pain" definition, and by being wholly negative. I haven't looked at older British usage at all.
     

    Bongone

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I believe you, veli. Don't the Oxford dictionaries offer any definition for the adjective "anodyne" that means "soothing"? If not, I'm surprised.;)
    There is quite a difference between soothing and soporific, owlman. And btw, I would never consider the WR dictionary to be a completely authoritative or reliable source.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I don't consider any dictionary to be a completely authoritative source, Bongone. That much confidence in one source of something seems a little foolish to me.
     
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