at January 1, 2010

UBCDAP

Member
Chinese - English
On the financial report of an accounting firm, I saw they put "At January 1, 2010, the company gave $XXX to related parties." Here my question is whether it is correct to use "at" instead of "on".
 
  • UBCDAP

    Member
    Chinese - English
    Hi sdgraham,

    I heard there is an explanation saying that the use of "at" in this case is to provide a sense of "snap shot." On the other hand, the use of "on" actually have a sense of "during" the period of that date. Here, I am somewhat confused as in most of the dictionaries, "on" is suggested. So, which is correct when it comes to accounting?

    Thank you very much
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    At <date> is often used to report a particular value of something that changes with time. At 23 September we had used 95% of the fuel estimate for the month.
    On <date> refers to something that happened on/within that date.

    I believe there are threads that discuss the difference between at <date> and on <date>, but I haven't found them yet.

    The financial position at 1 January 2010 was less favourable than we had anticipated.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    At <date> is often used to report a particular value of something that changes with time. At 23 September we had used 95% of the fuel estimate for the month. . . . The financial position at 1 January 2010 was less favourable than we had anticipated.
    I, like other respondents, would say "on".

    Is it possible that the use of "at", as in the examples above, is technical terminology that's common and proper in accounting and some other professions?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with panj that "at" can be used with dates. I'd see it, though, as an abbreviated version of "as at", and while it works in panj's example [As] at 23 September we had used 95% of the fuel estimate for the month I don't think it does in UBCDAP's:(. I'd need to change UBCDAP's sentence to past perfect: [As] at January 1, 2010, the company had given $XXX to related parties.
     

    UBCDAP

    Member
    Chinese - English
    Regarding "as at" and "as of," I heard that "as at" was wrong, which it is not even in the dictionary. In addition, some said that "as of" actually means "on" when it comes to dates. So, should we also use past perfect for "as of"? Or?
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    "As at" and "as of" are both fine by me, and I would regard them both as meaning 'the situation at that point in time'.

    I don't agree that past perfect is always needed, I think you can also use the present or present perfect tense :

    'As of/at January 1st, we have $10,000 left of our budget' (I am writing this on January 1st about the current situation and I anticipate that the situation will change in the future) vs.

    'As of/at January 1st, we have spent $10,000 of our budget' (I am writing this on January 1st and referring to past actions that took place before January 1st, and I anticipate that the situation will change in the future) vs.

    'As at/of January 1st, we had spent $10,000 of our budget' (I am writing this at some point after January 1st, referring to actions that took place before January 1st. We have probably already spent more than $10,000 since January 1st.)

    Hope that helps, although perhaps other people might have different ideas on how this is used.
     
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