<at> Justice

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
When John comes to work, as the chief of an experimental police force called PreCrime, his boss tells him:
— A gentleman at Justice wants to take all this away from us.
And explains to him that a Justice Department official is here to inspect the PreCrime system before the country votes on whether or not to take this system nationwide. Then adds:
— Watch this Danny Witwer, the observer from Justice. You can let him look around, answer his questions, but watch him.
Minority Report, movie

Does the use of "at" make sense here to you? I'd expect "with" or "from" in the first sentence, but not "at":confused:
Thanks.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm afraid it's perfectly normal American English. A gentleman at (the) Justice (Department) wants...
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This is a) science fiction, b) set in the future c) in the "noir" genre and d) uses AE. Any one or a combination of those may be enough for it not to be to HP 's taste :), although it was received quite well (IMDB 77%, Tomatometer 91%, Metacritic 80%) but at is frequently used to refer to where someone works (such as at the Department of Justice).
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've no argument with something like 'He works at the Department of Justice', but it shakes me to my very core to hear something like 'A gentleman at the Justice Department wants... ', if the said gentleman is at the same location as the speaker and listener.

    I'll now bow out of this and any future posts about this godawful film. :D
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I've no argument with something like 'He works at the Department of Justice', but it shakes me to my very core to hear something like 'A gentleman at the Justice Department wants... ', if the said gentleman is at the same location as the speaker and listener.

    I'll now bow out of this and any future posts about this godawful film. :D
    But you are not complaining about the film; you are complaining about American English usage. So you should have written, "I'll now bow out of this and any future posts about this godawful dialect of the Queen's English.":D
     
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