at my home or in my home [home vs house]

mfung

Member
china/chinese
Are these sentences correct:
1. The party will be held at my home.
2. The party will be held in my home.
3. The party will be held at the home.
4. The party will be held in the home.

Is there any difference between at my home and in my home?
 
  • Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Are these sentences correct:
    1. The party will be held at my home. This means that the party will be held at your house in general.
    2. The party will be held in my home. This means that the party will be held inside your house and it seems to restrict the ability of people to party outside as well.
    3. The party will be held at the home. :cross: Unless you mean a nursing home.
    4. The party will be held in the home. :cross: Unless you mean a nursing home.

    Is there any difference between at my home and in my home?

    I'd choose the first one.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think the first two sentences are fine and I don't see any real difference between them. The last two sentences sound incomplete to me. I would want to add "of X" after "in the home".

    I agree that these last two sentences would be correct as written if they refer to an institution of some kind (old age home, home for wayward translators...).
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Doyou want to make money in your own home?
    Forget real estate scams, tupperware, or becoming a spammer.
    Hello everyone.

    The above example is taken from a thread in the Spanish-English Grammar Forum. There the question was if 'at' could be used too.

    I know that 'in your own home' is often used in this kind of advertisements, but I'd like to know if 'at' would sound okay. There doesn't seem to be agreement on this matter, so I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me about its use.

    Please note that my question is not about the general rules/difference between 'at home' and 'in your home', but 'at your home' vs 'in your home', i.e. at/in + possessive determiner (my, your, etc) + noun/noun phrase.


    Thank you very much.
     
    Since this is still confusing to you, I agree with Hockey 13 that there can be a fine distinction made if absolutely necessary, but also with Nunty, that both sentences in casual conversation would also be used to tell people that the party is where your house is, not someone else's house.

    at my home, house, place, is your address where you live, and all the strutures inside and out that belong to you, and the property that is included. It is a location of a building and outside lawns, yards, ect.

    in my home could distinguish the partly will take place inside the one building you call your house, there will be no barbecue outside, no games outside, everything inside, indoors, not outdoors.

    "Since they predict rain next Saturday, the party will now take place in my home, sorry we can't cook outdoors as I had planned."
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left seven years ago
    Since this is still confusing to you, I agree with Hockey 13 that there can be a fine distinction made if absolutely necessary, but also with Nunty, that both sentences in casual conversation would also be used to tell people that the party is where your house is, not someone else's house.

    at my home, house, place, is your address where you live, and all the strutures inside and out that belong to you, and the property that is included. It is a location of a building and outside lawns, yards, ect.

    in my home could distinguish the partly will take place inside the one building you call your house, there will be no barbecue outside, no games outside, everything inside, indoors, not outdoors.

    "Since they predict rain next Saturday, the party will now take place in my home, sorry we can't cook outdoors as I had planned."

    First of all, thank you very much for your reply, Dale Texas. But I'm afraid this is not what I'm trying to find out; I may not have explained myself properly.

    Yes, it's confusing because in that thread native speakers don't agree that they'd ever say 'at your home' at all.

    As I said, I'm not asking about the general rules (in my example it doesn't matter if you work/make money inside the house/outside while e.g. hanging laundry, but sort of saying you don't need to go out, e.g. to work in an office), but about its use. Some, by the way very dear foreros, state that they would not say “work at your home' but 'at home/in your home'.

    Thanks again.:)
     
    Last edited:
    Ok, then if it's just about working, I agree I would never say work at your home, since that is already understood, anymore than I would say for school work, homework is school work you do at your home. I would say homework is school work you do at home. At home to me is a set standard phrase and it sounds silly to emplain that we are not talking about other peoples homes in both instances when the phrase itself already encompasses the notion of "your."

    However, there is to me another set phrase, and it is this, used for enthusiasm and emphasis, "work in your very own home" or "work in your own home "and meaning or implying "in comfort."

    These, like all set phrases, are not linguistic equivalents of algebraic formulas nececessarily understood with at/in + possessive determiner (my, your, etc) + noun/noun phrase. I respect that attempt very much. They go beyond that and each one is a unique pattern, if someone drops a word out, it doesn't "sound right."

    if somebody says "work in your home" I wonder why dropped they dropped the set word "own". They have chopped up the idiom.
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    What if the context is a party? I mean, would both at and in be possible here?

    Where's the party? Is it at
    / in your home?

    As at home doesn't fit here, I guessed at your home must be okay. Am I mistaken?
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    What if the context is a party? I mean, would both at and in be possible here?

    Where's the party? Is it at
    / in your home?

    As at home doesn't fit here, I guessed at your home must be okay. Am I mistaken?

    Because that is a very general enquiry about where the party is to by, the most natural question, to me, would be "Where's the party? Is it at your house / are you having it at home?"
    That is how we are most likely to word it in BE, anyway

    In fact, many people would shorten that to "... is it at yours?", although that version is too modern for me to be comfortable with it. :)
     

    ribran

    Senior Member
    English - American
    What if the context is a party? I mean, would both at and in be possible here?

    Where's the party? Is it at
    / in your home?

    As at home doesn't fit here, I guessed at your home must be okay. Am I mistaken?

    Is it at your house? is how I would say it.

    EDIT: Cross-posted with The Prof.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    Then would in / at my home sound weird too? The other foreros said these two sentences are okay. Why?

    They are not "incorrect". It is simply a matter of what people usually say, and generally speaking, those two versions far less likely to be used than the same sentences but using "house".
    I have never thought about it before, but the word "home" is only regularly used in a small number of expressions, such as "... (at) home", "in one's own home" and "in the home".
    Obviously, as a Brit, I can't speak for the rest of the world.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    Prof, what do you think about my second question?

    To me, yes. "Is it at your house?" is the standard question. It is asking about the general location, so can refer to both/either the outside and the inside of the house, whereas "is it in your house?" is more specifically "inside" your house. We could use it, but rarely would here unless it was genuinely important to know if the party was going to be inside. Even then, we would probably be more likely to word it differently or ask a second question to get that information: This party you are having at your house - will it be in the house or in the garden?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Americans seem to use the word 'home' for 'house' far more than us British. I'd probably say 'the party's at our place' whether we had a garden or not. After all you can hardly have a party that's only in the garden, unless you are the Queen.

    Hermione
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    1. The party will be held at my home.:cross:
    2. The party will be held in my home.:cross:
    3. The party will be held at the home.:cross:
    4. The party will be held in the home.:cross:

    To me the usual use of home is "I stayed at home" or "I went home". In these context I would say "The party will be held at my house". I agree with The Prof that home is not used nearly as much in BE as AE. My mother in law used to say things like "She has a lovely home" this sounded illiterate to me.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Americans seem to use the word 'home' for 'house' far more than us British.
    I would actually say that "home" is also pretty restricted in AE as well. I would never say "I'm throwing a party at my home." It would only be "house," "apartment," or "place."

    Sometimes I facetiously say "Welcome to our home" when inviting people in, but that's a sarcastic reference to how out-dated (and - I would almost feel - British) the word "home" sounds. I could also do the same with "You have a lovely home," but that would be a pretty campy version of "Wow, you've got a great place here."

    It also matters, I suspect, that a "home" is where a family lives and connotes a bit of "nesting," while young people mostly just have "places" and "houses."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would actually say that "home" is also pretty restricted in AE as well. I would never say "I'm throwing a party at my home." It would only be "house," "apartment," or "place."

    Sometimes I facetiously say "Welcome to our home" when inviting people in, but that's a sarcastic reference to how out-dated (and - I would almost feel - British) the word "home" sounds. I could also do the same with "You have a lovely home," but that would be a pretty campy version of "Wow, you've got a great place here."

    It also matters, I suspect, that a "home" is where a family lives and connotes a bit of "nesting," while young people mostly just have "places" and "houses."

    That pretty well sums up how I feel about it all. How absolutely enchanting!:D

    Hermione
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would actually say that "home" is also pretty restricted in AE as well. I would never say "I'm throwing a party at my home." It would only be "house," "apartment," or "place."

    That's very interesting lucas. Perhaps I particularly notice it, whereas I wouldn't notice anybody using the same expressions as me. On the other hand, or is it on the same hand, I would most definitely notice if a Brit used 'home' instead of house ( as a generic for the place you live in even if it isn't actually a house but an apartment. For me using 'home' instead of 'house' is rather like using the word 'residence' when answering the phone. Estate agent speak.

    So, all-in all what's the best advice we can give to a non -native speaker?

    It seems to me to be, use 'house': at my house, at my brother's house. Is there any good reason why non- native speakers should be advised to use 'home'?

    Hermione
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Well, for starters, non-natives should feel free to use "home" in phrases like "at home" or quasi-adverbially in "to go home"/"to stay home."

    Secondly, there are (rare) situations where the connotations of "home" - basically homey-ness, like when you've really moved in somewhere, and it feels comfortable and right for you, and probably when you're living with some kind of family or family-like arrangement (children, spouse, long-term boyfriend/girlfriend) - are appropriate. So I might be comfortable with saying "You two have made a really great home for yourselves here." (Or is this just a case of another set phrase, "to make a home (for oneself)"?) But there's also "She died Thursday in her home of 20 years, surrounded by her children and grandchildren." And another phrase, "to feel at home," comes to mind. And, of course, you can think about "home" or miss "home" when you're away from it: "I know this has been a super-great vacation, but I'm just at that point where I'm really missing my home."

    Conversely, we often want to emphasize the "home's" qualities of safety, reassuring-ness, comfort, and privacy. This can be seen when something happens that shatters our idea of "home": "The attacker had broken into her home." "Ugh. After finding out that Daren was such a creep, I can't believe I ever let him into my home."

    I guess perhaps it might be a general rule of thumb to say: "my house" and "my place" are locations, but "my home" is an idea​.
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    But there's also "She died Thursday in her home of 20 years, surrounded by her children and grandchildren."
    This in doesn't necessarily mean she didn't die in the garden, does it?
    ... I don't see any real difference between them.
    ... I agree with Hockey 13 that there can be a fine distinction made if absolutely necessary, but also with Nunty, that both sentences in casual conversation would also be used to tell people that the party is where your house is, not someone else's house.
    Nunty and Dale Texas were saying that in one's home can sometimes mean the same as at one's home. Would the same apply to house?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    This in doesn't necessarily mean she didn't die in the garden, does it?
    No, this sentence pretty much only means that she died peacefully in bed. It's a stock phrase used in obituaries.
    Nunty and Dale Texas were saying that in one's home can sometimes mean the same as at one's home. Would the same apply to house?
    "In my house" means "inside my house" (versus "outside my house"). "At my house" means "located on my property" (versus "located somewhere else"). The point is that they're comparing two different things.
     
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