at/on eternal/everlasting mooring/moorage

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Dear friends!!!

In some countries and Russia is no exception there are ships that took part in different battles in the past, maybe even in wars, and which are now used as a museum and considered a monument to those events. For example, cruiser "Avrora" in St.Petersburg is one of such ships. It was built in 1901, took part in the Russian-Japanese war (1904-1905), its cannon fired a blank short signalling the beginning of the assault of the Winter Palace during the Great October Revolution (1917), and "Avrora" took part in the World War II. Now it is at/on eternal/everlasting mooring/moorage

Which phrase sounds best to you?

Thanks!!!
 
  • The Wikipedia entry for the Queen Mary says:
    The ship is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is permanently berthed in Long Beach, California serving as a museum ship and hotel.

    "Permanently berthed" as used here, seems to work.
    Hello! Is it correct to say "... IS permanently berthed ..."? Since this event occurred at some time point in the past, I think it should be "... WAS permanently berthed ..." or if we still want to use "IS" we need to add something indicating the present moment like "now" or "at present":

    "... IS permanently berthed now/at present ..."
    "WAS permanently berthed"

    What do you think about it?

    Thanks!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Dmitry

    Think of this logically rather than grammatically.

    If you say is berthed, (present tense) how can it be anything other than now?

    If you say "WAS permanently berthed," you are using the past tense, saying that the ship is no longer where it was - so obviously the berth was not permanent, since the ship has moved.
     
    If you say is berthed, (present tense) how can it be anything other than now?
    It cannot, I know. I was asking about a different thing, however. Please, see below.


    If you say "WAS permanently berthed," you are using the past tense, saying that the ship is no longer where it was - so obviously the berth was not permanent, since the ship has moved.
    Really? I do not agree. When we say "WAS" we, of course, mean that the event we are talking about NOW happened in the past. But this does not mean that the ship has been taken somewhere from the place where it was. When, for example, we say that "Russian emperors beginning from the 18th century were buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral" we mean that it happened some time ago but they still rest there, their tombs have not been moved anywhere. Maybe that is different. So why not say "WAS permanently berthed" to say that it was berthed in 1948 and in those times it was decided that the ship would never sail again?

    Thanks!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    OK... I see now how you used "berthed" as a verb.

    Sorry.

    I would have crafted the sentence a bit differently to avoid the confusion, however.
     
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