at/on my engagement

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dumbfounded

Senior Member
persian
We were planning invitations for the guest. Which preposition is the correct one?
I will invite these persons at/on my engagement.
I think both are right but I am not sure.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't know what you mean by inviting people "to an engagement". You might invite people to an engagement ceremony or to an engagement party perhaps, depending on the custom in your country or in the country where the celebrations are to take place.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Dumbfounded, it appears that the other responders are confused, as I am. What type of event are you having, and are you using "engagement" to mean "the time when you and your fiancee reach an agreement to get married," or something else? (Crossposted with sdgraham, who has the same question.)
     

    fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    Dumbfounded, if you mean the equivalent of a namzadi, you can say "who did you invite to your engagement ceremony?". "Engagement" means the (usually more) private marriage proposal/agreement between future spouses. One would offer someone congratulations on or upon (the occasion of) their engagement to another person, but one wouldn't invite someone "on" their engagement.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Dumbfounded, as it is, we can't help you. You seem to think that "my engagement" is used to refer to some sort of party or event, but it's not. Tell us clearly what you're talking about and we will try to help.
     

    dumbfounded

    Senior Member
    persian
    Context: I asked my friend how many guests he invited on/to his engagement party?
    PS: Consider engagement as wedding party.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    You can certainly say "engagement party" - that's fine. And if your culture has some sort of public ceremony to mark an engagement, you can certainly call it an "engagement ceremony." But what "engagement" (without "party" or "ceremony" after it) means in English is "an agreement to marry." It occurs between the two people who decide to get married, and while it's usually announced afterward, the agreement is just that: an agreement. There is no connotation of any sort of public event. So you need to say whether you mean a party or a ceremony. As for which preposition to use, in the sentence above, it would be "to": "How many guests did you invite to your engagement party?"
     
    Last edited:

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I agree with sound shift. You cannot in English invite anyone to your engagement. An engagement is a status or an agreement - it's not something that anyone can be invited to. But you can invite people to your engagement party.
     

    dumbfounded

    Senior Member
    persian
    I am confused with the reply in thread 16.
    Consider this sentence...
    Sam, you know I invited William, John and Liza on my engagement.
    In my language it looks on is better , but I don't know about the right preposition.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Context: I asked my friend how many guests he invited on/to his engagement party?
    PS: Consider engagement as wedding party.
    You would ask your friend how many guests he invited to his engagement party.

    I am confused with the reply in thread 16.
    Consider this sentence...
    Sam, you know I invited William, John and Liza on my engagement.
    In my language it looks on is better , but I don't know about the right preposition.
    The right preposition in English is "to", not "on".
    Sam, you know I invited William, John and Liza to my engagement [party]. :)
     
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