@ (at sign)

Tresley

Senior Member
British English
Can anyone tell me how to say 'at sign' in French please? It looks like this -----> @

Moderator's note: several threads have been merged to create this one. Summary:

In English
@ = at sign
In an email address, eg: suzie@WordReference.com
suzie at WordReference dot com

In French
@ = une arobase (prononcé
[arobaz])
ou a commercial (plutôt au Québec)

Dans une adresse email, ex : suzie@WordReference.com
suzie arobase WordReference point com
ou, plus "moderne"
suzie at WordRefrence point com

Related thread on the usage of "arobase":
arobas / arobase - Terme et usage
 
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  • anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Bonjour!

    I would say: arobase!
    Le signe « @ » a pour nom arrobe ou arobe : c'est ce qu'on trouve dans la norme Unicode mais aussi dans les dictionnaires courants.
    On trouve aussi arobase (qui a un certain succès dans les gosiers français), arobace, arobas...

    Source
     

    bernik

    Senior Member
    Brittany - french
    @ is supposed to be called arobase or "a commercial".
    But when they are spelling an e-mail address,
    I think French people often say 'at'.
    Sometimes they say 'chez'.
     

    CARNESECCHI

    Senior Member
    French / France
    Hello,
    Before Internet, it was named "a commercial", as the signe "&" = eperluette was named "é commercial". The name "arobas" "arobase" "arrobas" and some other writings mean "a rond bas (de casse)" "bas de casse" = caractères courants (now, it means "minuscule"); "haut de casse" = "caractères moins fréquents", haut et bas = position of characters in the typographers' boxes ordering. Since "arobas" is modern, it must mean "a rond minuscule"
    For keybords, "uppercase" and "lowercase" refer to the position of the carriage (hence "carriage return" for the "new line" key) on mechanical typewriters (up = majuscules, low = minuscules)
    Hope it helps
     

    Japanada

    Senior Member
    English Canada
    Hi all. Very helpful forum. First post here. Just a quick question.

    How do you pronounce "@" in french, like when you're telling someone an email address: in english: mikejones "at" yahoo.com. En francais . . . ?
     

    giga2294

    Senior Member
    Français / France - Brittany
    I agree with Gb56.
    When you spell an email address in french (e.g. bill.gates@microsoft.com) you use 'at' as follow: "bill point gates at microsoft point com" ("bill dot gates at microsoft dot com" in english).
    Arobase is only for the sign '@'.
    Hope it helps
     

    El Dookie

    Member
    France (French)
    Well guys... I do not agree with you!
    In my job here I call many many people, and often speak to secretaries but also CEOs, Doctors, surgeons, etc, most of them, if you say "at" they won't know what you are talking about, even in an email address.

    The majority of the people use "arobase", I wouldn't use "at" when speaking to someone I suspect is not an internet addict.
     

    hunternet

    Senior Member
    France - French
    I don't agree with you :eek:
    I mean when talking about an email address we (all the people i know !!) say 'at' but when speaking about the sign '@' we say 'arobase'...
    :thumbsup:

    Well guys... I do not agree with you!
    In my job here I call many many people, and often speak to secretaries but also CEOs, Doctors, surgeons, etc, most of them, if you say "at" they won't know what you are talking about, even in an email address.

    The majority of the people use "arobase", I wouldn't use "at" when speaking to someone I suspect is not an internet addict.
    Well, partially true, we use both I think. But if they don't understand the "at" in your company, maybe they don't use the e-mail stuff on a daily basis...
     

    FAC13

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    How common is "escargot"? I know it used occasionally but by whom? What register of language does it belong to, childish?
     

    Sencha

    Senior Member
    France French
    How common is "escargot"? I know it used occasionally but by whom? What register of language does it belong to, childish?
    I heard it only once, it was an adult who was speaking as if he was a child. I like it though, I find it funny and... poetic !
     

    zibou

    Senior Member
    French - France/ English - England
    I think it's a difference in formality. With friends I'd sometimes use "at", but in a formal or work context, I would definitely say "arobase".
     

    Gutenberg

    Senior Member
    français international
    "Au Québec, on emploie surtout les termes a commercial et arobas (arrobas), prononcé [arobas], pour désigner le concept étudié. Ce dernier est également en usage en Europe, mais c'est plutôt arobase (arrobase), prononcé [arobaz], et arrobe qui ont la faveur des locuteurs européens. Arrobe et arobase ont d'ailleurs fait l'objet d'une recommandation dans le Journal officiel de la République française." (source : GDT)
     

    zibou

    Senior Member
    French - France/ English - England
    Je pense que c'est aussi comme courriel, e-mail, et mèl; ou centimes/cent (pour les centimes d'euro, qui prend un s ou non d'ailleurs). Il y a une différence de pays, de contexte, et puis aussi de choix personnel.
     

    asmoen

    Member
    USA, English
    When I worked in France (a suburb just outside of Geneva), everyone in the office said "arobase" in place of "at." "bill point gates arobase microsoft point com"
     

    zibou

    Senior Member
    French - France/ English - England
    le concept de a commercial est un concept anglophone, alors qu'en Europe, le symbole est venu d'Espagne.

    C'est seulement en anglais, à l'origine que l'on dit pommes @ 10$ le kg
     

    toban

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I hear arobase and a commercial used interchangeably in French here. I have never heard "at" used for the "@" symbol in Quebec French.

    In English, "@" is so unequivocally associated with the word "at" that we use it not only in e-mail addresses, but also in shorthand. "See you @ Tim Hortons @ 2:00" --> "See you at Tim Hortons at 2:00."
     

    Billiamian

    New Member
    U.S.A. Italian (an American Emigre)
    I'm an American living in Italy, and I just got a call from a Frenchman re: a summer rental in Sardinia. I suspected that his address was not "xyz@arubas.live.fr"...

    "@" in Italian is "chiocciola", which of course in French is "escargot" (imagine my flummoxed consternation ;)

    Thanks to all for the great forum thread
     
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