at the age of vs aged

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Cheeto_, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Cheeto_

    Cheeto_ New Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Hello, members of the forum :)

    I'm a little confused by the usage of the constructions "at the age of" and "aged". Can we say that in some cases they can be used interchangeable? For example, do both of them sound fine in this example:
    "Citizens aged/at the age of 18 and older must contact the director"?
    Thanks in advance!
    P.S. If I have any mistakes in my question, please, point them out
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Welcome to the forum.:)
    To me, this is unwieldy and not idiomatic, not to mention wordy.
     
  3. The Newt

    The Newt Senior Member

    USA / EEUU
    English - US
    "Citizens ages 18 and up..." is probably what I would say.
     
  4. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Chino, California
    English, AE
    Citizens aged/at the age of 18 and older must contact the director. Is how we would say it.
     
  5. The Newt

    The Newt Senior Member

    USA / EEUU
    English - US
    That works for me.
     
  6. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    "At the age of..." indicates a point in that person's life, so you can't add "and above":

    He climbed Mount Everest for the last time at the age of 76.
     
  7. Cheeto_

    Cheeto_ New Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Thanks you all for your answers. :)
    I now see why "At the age of" makes no sense in my suggested sentence. However, what about this, much simplier example:
    "He died aged 60" (taken from aged | Definition of aged in English by Oxford Dictionaries) vs "He died at 60"
    Do they both sound fine and convey the same meaning?
     
  8. pops91710

    pops91710 Senior Member

    Chino, California
    English, AE
    Not in AE.
    The way it is said in USA.
     

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