at the beginning of / early in / in early

Dotop

Member
Russian - Russia
Hello.

We met at the beginning of winter.
We met in early winter.
We met early in winter.


Are these sentences interchangeable?
 
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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us some context. Are you referring to a meeting (or the forming of an acquaintance) in January, or in late February? What are you trying to emphasize with your sentence?

    [Cross-posted with edits to the original post]
     
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    Dotop

    Member
    Russian - Russia
    What are you trying to emphasize with your sentence?
    Nothing. Two people met for the first time, or maybe ten people met for the 100th time, would it matter?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It doesn't matter whether it was two people forming an acquaintance or ten people having a meeting.

    I see that you have edited your original example sentences. For the original version, with "2019" instead of "winter," it does matter whether it was in January or in late February, For your new version, the months would be different, but we do need to know the approximate date in order to be able to help you.

    It would also help if we knew whether you were drafting a business e-mail, writing a poem, or talking casually to a friend.
     

    Dotop

    Member
    Russian - Russia
    Okay, if it's all important, then I assume the sentences are not interchangeable. Please close the thread. I'd rather you even delete it.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The sentences may well be interchangeable in some contexts. We'll be happy to help you understand the nuances if you'll provide the information we need.

    The thread will remain open, in case the question should be of interest to others.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
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