at the butcher's/ the grocer's /the hairderesser's [= shop?]

MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
Question: I think I understood, but wanna ask you, butcher's or grocer's is a shop?
Added by Cagey, moderator

Yeah, why not? Butcher's is a shop where a butcher works? And grocer works in grocer's? Does it work like that? We just add 's to the person who works in and get a shop name?
 
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  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    You can do that with some (but not all) occupations:
    I need to stop at the jeweler's to have my watch repaired.

    [Off-topic comment removed. DonnyB - moderator]
     
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    Englishisgreat

    Senior Member
    German
    [This question and the following posts have been added to a previous thread on the same topic. DonnyB - moderator]
    Dear all,

    When I have to buy food or I need a new haircut, It is right to say in English:

    I have to go to the grocer's/hairdresser's/lawyer's/bakery's?
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    go to the grocer's/hairdresser's/baker's*

    I think the above are fine when referring to small neighbourhood joints run by the respective professionals.

    I have never heard of 'going to the lawyer's' and I would not word it that way. I might get legal advice or see a lawyer, etc.

    * it is baker's or bakery, not bakery's :cross:
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have never heard of 'going to the lawyer's' and I would not word it that way. I might get legal advice or see a lawyer, etc.
    In BrE, you might go "to the solicitor's", if the person you are speaking to already knows that you currently have dealings with a solicitor, for example if you are involved in a legal case or are buying or selling a house. Most people most of the time don't consult solicitors at all, and it would probably sound odd if you announced that you were going to the solicitor's out of the blue.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In BrE, you might go "to the solicitor's", if the person you are speaking to already knows that you currently have dealings with a solicitor...
    Ah, yes, under such circumstances I would not think anything of it, of course. That would be very much like saying 'I'm going to aunt Mary's', wouldn't it? :)
     
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