at the cost of

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bieq

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello,

Today I said to my friend, in italian: "Il tuo spagnolo è migliorato moltissimo ultimamente" and she said "Yes, but at the cost of forgetting other languages".

My question is about how to say what my friend said, but in italian.

"At the cost of forgetting other languages"

My attempt:

"Col sacrificio di/al prezzo di dimenticare altre lingue"

I am not sure, so thank you!

Ben
 
  • GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would say "al costo di dimenticare...". "Sacrificio" doesn't sound right to me, here. And prezzo also is not as convincing (to me) as "costo". Go with "costo". It's safer. (Even though I'm not a native speaker...)
     

    Zenof

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I would say "al costo di dimenticare...". "Sacrificio" doesn't sound right to me, here. And prezzo also is not as convincing (to me) as "costo". Go with "costo":tick:. It's safer. (Even though I'm not a native speaker...)
    Yes Gavin is right.

    Al costo di dimenticare...
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    al costo di dimenticare
    No, I'm sorry, I have to disagree. It would be 'a costo'. But in this sentence it can't work, in my opinion, because of the verb after it and the fact that in Italian, unlike in the English, it should be in the past tense. You could say "il mio spagnolo migliorerà a costo di dimenticare le altre lingue", but not "è migliorato a costo di dimenticare". I'd suggest something like "è migliorato a discapito (della conoscenza) delle altre lingue", or "è migliorato anche se ho dimenticato/ questo è significato dimenticare le altre lingue". ;):)
     
    Last edited:

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Well, in my opinion, the correct use of 'al costo di' is only with the meaning of 'at the (same) price of', e.g. 'sms al costo di una chiamata urbana/ al costo di 0.01 Euro'. But the language evolves, of course... ;):)
     

    bieq

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    No, I'm sorry, I have to disagree. It would be 'a costo'. But in this sentence it can't work, in my opinion, because of the verb after it and the fact that in Italian, unlike in the English, it should be in the past tense. You could say "il mio spagnolo migliorerà a costo di dimenticare le altre lingue", but not "è migliorato a costo di dimenticare". I'd suggest something like "è migliorato a discapito (della conoscenza) delle altre lingue", or "è migliorato anche se ho dimenticato/ questo è significato dimenticare le altre lingue". ;):)

    Grazie,

    Sei stato chiarissimo, come al solito.

    Ben

    :)
     

    pask46

    Senior Member
    Italy-italian
    As partially pointed by Necsus, "a costo di", in this case, does not fit.
    It's an expression used in a future context... when we are facing a problem or a bad situation and we know there will be a price to pay, whether in terms of sacrifice, money, time or whatever. There is the will, and it is so strong that we can sacrifice other things to achieve that result.

    "Lo farò io, a costo di stare alzato tutta la notte"
    "Ci arriverò, a costo di doverci andare a piedi!"
    "Imparerò l'inglese a costo di dimenticare l'italiano"

    While "al prezzo di" is generally used for something that has happened or, in its common use, when talking about prices.
    You can also use "ci è/mi è costato" or "ho dovuto sacrificare/rinunciare a/abbandonare"
    To render the meaning of Bieq sentence in the past, you have to change some.

    "L'ho fatto, ma mi è toccato stare alzato tutta la notte"
    "Ci sono arrivato, ma son dovuto andare a piedi!"
    "Ho imparato l'inglese, ma ho dovuto dimenticare l'italiano"

    Hope it helps.
     
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