At the drop of a hat

Alisson Pereira

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hoi,

Wat is de beste uitdrukking ervoor.

> We don't learn how to speak a language at the drop of a hat.

Mijn beste gok is: "We leren niet hoe een taal te spreken van nacht tot dag''

Dank bij voorbaat
 
  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Linguee.nl: "bij de minste aanleiding" >>> zomaar? Ik betwijfel dat je Engelse zin in het oké is. Je vindt er echter goeie op linguee.nl.

    Het is volgens mij interessanter om op zomaar te focussen:
    - Hij komt zomaar binnenlopen
    - Je kunt niet zomaar weggaan wanneer je wil
    - Een cadeautje? Waarom? --- Zomaar (just like that)
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    'Zomaar' past niet in deze context.

    at the drop of a hat is een uitdrukking die op vele wijzen vertaald wordt in Linguee en meestal met 'zomaar'.
    En in Reverso ook, maar daar komt mijn voorstel ook voor:
    In een oogwenk. In het Spaans is het perfect : en un santiamén.

    In feite is een idiomatische uitdrukking nodig. Zoals:...van vandaag op morgen.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    ¿Por qué no? Het is flets als vertaling voor een uitdrukking.
    Het zegt niet veel, niet zomaar, omdat het op alles past. At a drop af a hat is heel specifiek ' in zeer korte tijd'.
     
    Last edited:

    Alisson Pereira

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Ja, Eno2 heeft gelijk

    ''We leren niet in zeer korte tijd hoe een taal te spreken''

    ''We leren niet hoe een taal te spreken in zeer korte tijd''

    Zijn de twee woordvolgorde ok?
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Ja. De tweede optie is de beste. Maar we zeggen liever 'een taal spreken' Zonder 'hoe' en zonder 'te' .
    Een taal spreken leer je niet in zeer korte tijd. Maar ik vind dat je snelle vorderingen maakte.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Ik ben het niet eens met jouw stelling dat een uitdrukking in één taal door een andere uitdrukking moet worden vertaald, maar wil hier geen side-thread opstarten. De ene taal gebruikt vaker uitdrukkingen dan de andere (het Frans bv. veel minder in formele teksten) én een vertaling moet vooral vlot zijn. De tweetalige reclames nu worden steeds verschillender omdat ze net andere middelen gebruiken.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Moet: Moeten niet. Wel bij voorkeur, zeker als er een volledig dekkende idiomatische uitdrukking voorhanden is. Het garandeert in het algemeen ook beter dat je in hetzelfde register blijft.
    Reclames beschouw ik nauwelijks als vertalingen. Het zijn verre vertalingen, als je wil... Gericht op het emotionele taal'nest'gevoel van het doelgebied.
     
    Last edited:

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Oké, maar je moet allereerst uitgaan van de juiste betekenis. Kan die "volledig dekkend" weergegeven worden met een uitdrukking, uiteraard. Maar die volledige dekking incl. register is volgens mij nog niet zo evident...
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Tja, eigenlijk vind ik de hele zin plots wat verdacht. IK zou bijvoorbeeld "in een handomdraai" eerder gebruiken in verband met praktische vaardigheden: iets doen. Daarnaast dan: ik leer een taal niet in 1-2-3, niet zonder moeite; een taal leren vergt tijd, enz.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    De O.P. zin is een waarheid als een koe. Niets verdachts aan.

    Je leert een taal niet via een kleine inspanning

    een taal leren vergt tijd,
    Tijd en inspanning.
    De zin is evenwel negatief geformuleerd:
    Een taal leren vergt geen kleine inspanning/ vergt geen kleine tijdsbesteding.

    'Je leert een taal niet .. 'at the drop of a hat' vormt een understatement.
    Wat vrij gelijkaardig is aan het al geciteerde understatement 'in een vloek en een zucht. Of gewoon 'in een zucht', als je niet graag gevloek hoort. Dat is dus ook idiomatisch ën in hetzelfde understatement register, net als 'in een oogwenk', in een handomdraai, etc...
     
    Last edited:

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    It's not really univocal. Also one sees the most diverse translations in Linguee and Reverso.

    But yes, wider context lacks, and the source is not quoted. Though in this case it's clear what it is meant to mean.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    1. If you offered to sell me your car, I'd accept at the drop of a hat.
    2. You said that you will want someone to go to Paris or Tokyo: Well, I'm willing to go anywhere at the drop of a hat.
    3. He was a wonderful musician: at the drop of a hat, he could play anything you requested.
    4. 1901 G. Ade 40 Modern Fables 49 Every Single Man in Town was ready to Marry her at the Drop of the Hat.
    5. 1944 M. Sharp Cluny Brown iv. 30 Miss Cream's visit coincided with a week of superb weather. At the drop of a hat she stripped and sunbathed—or rather, a hat was the only thing she didn't drop.
    "At the drop of a hat" is a little more than "immediately" or "promptly": it also has the idea that the task would be no inconvenience or is something that the person would do without effort or constraint.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    > We don't learn how to speak a language at the drop of a hat.

    Mijn beste gok is: "We leren niet hoe een taal te spreken van nacht tot dag''
    Obviously, (i) there is a lack of context, (ii) absent that context, it does not seem to be an appropriate use of the phrase.

    If you bear in mind (ii) then the best that I can do is
    > We don't learn how to speak a language at the drop of a hat. -> we do not [decide to] learn to speak a language without considering what it will require from us / We do not decide that we should learn a language suddenly and without preparation.
    "We leren niet hoe een taal te spreken van nacht tot dag'' -> > We don't learn how to speak a language in a day. (which is quite different.)
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    "Van nacht tot dag" heeft enkel een letterlijke betekenis voor zover ik weet en kan controleren.
    Als uitdrukking en figuurlijk luidt het 'van vandaag op morgen" (=op korte tijd)
    As I said, It's self evident what his phrase with the expression 'at the drop of a hat' is meant to mean, wright or wrong.
    A.P always gives an expression without further context. That's his system. He puts a word or an expression in a single sentence , always without linking or quoting from where it comes, which is normally required to do here. . Sometimes of course, it are purely his own concoctions that can't be linked . One never knows which is the case, he doesn't explain..
     
    Last edited:

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I am quite pleased to hear from a native speaker how he uses the xpression, and I really believe he is some kind of an authority. I have lots of sympathy for Alisson, and he knows, but he is a eager learner both of English (and to some extent most of us remain learners if we are not native speakers) and Dutch. However, one of the most challenging things about learning a language is how to use idioms, and Alisson cannot hear a live speaker of Dutch reacting face to face to what he writes. That is why it is sometime troublesome for him to use the words in the right context, which -so I have come to realize in my 12-year-career as a Dutch as FL/ NT2 teacher - is one of the hardest things to learn, because it is that subtle... So here Alisson meant well, but the sentence proves to be fairly awkward in English, would be my conclusion.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    I have sympathy for his rapid progress too.

    But he'd better follow rules on context and quoting (source links), making basic searches before consulting, and proposing a tentative solution himself.
    There's another basic rule I can't bother to mention because I'm jumping it myself.:oops:

    and I really believe he is some kind of an authority.
    Still 'At the drop of a hat' isn't univocal.

    Try to translate all these with 'at short notice': (there are only 178 results...)

    without effort
    Sure

    We don't learn how to speak a language at the drop of a hat.
    Without effort.
     
    Last edited:

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In this case I really thought we were able to guess the intended meaning from the sentence itself. I mean: in this connection we always think of the time needed to learn the language. It might have been better if he had asked for Dutch equivalents of "in no time (in little time)" [which I would call a concept]. Then he would have got both (a) very common idioms and (b) maybe some expressions. (To some extent that has happened, but ...)
     

    Alisson Pereira

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I was choosing my words about this thread, but the only matter is, I just have to keep studying to improve myself. Thanks all of you.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top