at the end of the gathering’ or ‘in the end’.

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
#1
Hi,everyone.

The following is from an English textbook for junior high school students in China, co-edited by DC Canada Education Publishing and Heibei Education Press.

Jenny’s family gathers at Grandma and Grandpa’s house on Thanksgiving Day. ... The family gathering is exciting. It is a fun and lively evening with a big meal, delicious desserts, lots of games and good conversation. At the end, they take a family photo.

I wonder if ‘at the end’ should be ‘at the end of the gathering’ or ‘in the end’.

Thanks a lot in advance.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    #2
    With an event, use "at" for a point in time or distance:
    at the start
    at the end
    at the three-quarter point (usually with reference to a race)​

    "In the end" does not refer to one particular event, but to everything that went before. "In the end, Peter and Julie decided to get married".
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    #3
    Thanks, Uncle Jack.

    I wonder if ‘at the end of the gathering’ and ‘in the end’ are also OK in the OP.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    #4
    Not really. "In the end" is used more for a conclusion resulting from what had happened before. This isn't a strict definition, but it's use here seems wrong.
     
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