At website or on website?

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  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hello Sane, and welcome to WordReference.

    It's difficult to be sure without any context (context is required in these forums) but probably you should say "on the website".

    If you post the complete sentence it might be possible to be more certain.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I would normally expect to see "a" or "the" in front of website, but there may be a way of using the word without one of these; I just can't think of one. (This is why posting a sample sentence would help.)

    I would say that "on" is the most usual, but "at" would be possible in some cases, for example: "you can make a payment at the website" (or generally where the website is the place where an action takes place, rather than where something simply is). However, I would usually expect: "the details are on the website".
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    on a Web site (note that since [World Wide] Web is actually a proper name. some will maintain this term is more correctly written in two words)

    go to a Web site
     

    Sane

    Member
    Bengali
    Thank you all very much.

    Here is the sentence:

    “There is a poll at the Party web site where you can vote for the candidates.”

    If I use “on the Party web site” may it not also mean that the poll is about the web site?
    Thanks
     

    hamlet

    Senior Member
    Français (FR)
    hello, couldyou say : "go onto a website" instead of "go to a website"? also what would be better between : "I found that picture at Peter's website" or "on Peter's website"? thanks
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Normall I use something like "it's on my website at http://www.duckswild.com"

    (We normally say at an address for references other than the Internet as well, e.g. you can send mail to me at 1234 Sample Road, Somewhere, XX or you can send me a fax at 555 555-1000)
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Normall I use something like "it's on my website at http://www.duckswild.com"

    (We normally say at an address for references other than the Internet as well, e.g. you can send mail to me at 1234 Sample Road, Somewhere, XX or you can send me a fax at 555 555-1000)
    Ah, yes, it's true that I generally use 'at' when I give the URL and on when I give the name of the website.
     

    Krigannie

    New Member
    Russian - Russia
    I'm sorry for asking a question in a very dated discussion, but I have a question which is related to this topic and I don't feel like creating a new one.

    So I've a question about prepositions in the sentence ''I am an administrator on/of blablabla.com website and would like to blablabla...''. My question is what preposition do I have to use here - ''on'' or ''of''. I feel like both are okay, but I kind of like ''on'' better. I want to hear what native speakers have to say about this. Thanks.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Hello Krigannie, and welcome to the WR Forum!

    In your context I would say I am the administrator of the xxx.com website. (If you are the only administrator.)
    or I am an administrator of the... (if there are other administrators.)
     

    hamlet

    Senior Member
    Français (FR)
    Hello Krigannie, and welcome to the WR Forum!

    In your context I would say I am the administrator of the xxx.com website. (If you are the only administrator.)
    or I am an administrator of the... (if there are other administrators.)
    Just a quick peripheral question: would you say "I'm the admin of the website 'wordreference.com'"?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Doing something at a website
    Some information on a website???
    We need a complete sentence for each question in order to be sure we are answering your question correctly.

    For instance:
    I would say:
    I saw some information on a website,
    and
    I got some information from a website.

    What were you doing 'at the website'?
     

    MFT

    New Member
    French - South of France
    Ah, yes, it's true that I generally use 'at' when I give the URL and on when I give the name of the website.
    Hi there, I'm reviving an old thread here but I hope someone can answer this.
    When talking about something you saw on a specific website, like a job advertisement, would you then say "I'm writing in reference to the advertisement you posted at Indeed.com" or "on Indeed.com"? Is it considered a name or a URL?
    Thanks for the help!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Strictly speaking, "indeed.com" is a domain, not a URL, although putting it in a browser might lead you to some page, somewhere.
    See Wikipedia:
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    A Uniform Resource Locator (URL), colloquially termed a web address,[1] is a reference to a web resource that specifies its location on a computer network and a mechanism for retrieving it. A URL is a specific type of Uniform Resource Identifier (URI),[2][3] although many people use the two terms interchangeably.[4][a] URLs occur most commonly to reference web pages (http), but are also used for file transfer (ftp), email (mailto), database access (JDBC), and many other applications.
    Most web browsers display the URL of a web page above the page in an address bar. A typical URL could have the form Example Domain, which indicates a protocol (http), a hostname (www.example.com), and a file name (index.html).
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    When talking about something you saw on a specific website, like a job advertisement, would you then say "I'm writing in reference to the advertisement you posted at Indeed.com" or "on Indeed.com"? Is it considered a name or a URL?
    It's a website address. I would probably go for "at" but really, you could use either: I'm sure I've come across both in that sort of context.
     
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