at your stint?

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HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
I thought a simple dictionary visit would solve the problem but to no avail. Is it at your stint or on your stint or something else? My gut feeling tells me 'at,' but I'm not too sure.

Hope things are going well for you at your new work
= Hope things are going well for you at your new gig
= Hope things are going well for you ( ) your new stint
 
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'm not sure I understand what you think stint means. It isn't a synonym for job/work or gig, it means (more or less) a period of time. For example:

    I enjoyed my stint at university.

    What exactly are you trying to say?:)
     

    idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As london calling says, a stint is a period of time - usually, but not always, a relatively short one. So you could say, for example, "I hope things went well for you during your stint as manager."
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Thanks, both of you. Yes, it's more like the period of time for a temporary dispatch for a specific piece of work to be done. So it's different from the rest in nature.

    Thanks,

    Hiro
     
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