Athlete/sports vs practitioner/activity

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Packard

Senior Member
USA, English
I recently had a heated debate on whether golf was a sport or simply an activity. I maintain it is an activity.

I have a good idea in my mind what an athlete is and what sports are.

Here are some examples of "sports":

Baseball, Football (American), track & field events, soccer, martial arts, boxing, etc.


Some "sports" don't make the cut for me and they seem more like "activities" and the participants seem more like "practitioners" than athletes.

Here are some examples:

Fishing (some, not all types), Darts, billiards, pistol/rifle marksmanship, etc.


And then there are some that are "on the cusp".

Here are some examples:

Golf, archery, bowling.


I have for many years made the cutoff based on this test:

Does the activity normally require a jock strap? If so, it is a sport and the participant is an athlete; if not it is not a sport and the participant is not an athlete. This, of course, runs into the obstacle when the sport is female dominated (field hockey, for example), but it does delineate the cut off in most cases.

So where to draw the line on "athletics" and "sports" vs. "activities" and "practitioners"?
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I recently had a heated debate on whether golf was a sport or simply an activity. I maintain it is an activity.

    I have a good idea in my mind what an athlete is and what sports are.

    Here are some examples of "sports":

    Baseball, Football (American), track & field events, soccer, martial arts, boxing, etc.


    Some "sports" don't make the cut for me and they seem more like "activities" and the participants seem more like "practitioners" than athletes.

    Here are some examples:

    Fishing (some, not all types), Darts, billiards, pistol/rifle marksmanship, etc.


    And then there are some that are "on the cusp".

    Here are some examples:

    Golf, archery, bowling.


    I have for many years made the cutoff based on this test:


    Does the activity normally require a jock strap? If so, it is a sport and the participant is an athlete; if not it is not a sport and the participant is not an athlete. This, of course, runs into the obstacle when the sport is female dominated (field hockey, for example), but it does delineate the cut off in most cases.

    So where to draw the line on "athletics" and "sports" vs. "activities" and "practitioners"?
    All puns intended?


    The athletic philosophy department is closed for annual maintenance. This is a language forum.

    Thread amusing but closed.
     
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