attain a horse

Egoexpress

Senior Member
Hungary, Hungarian
Hi there,

I hope the following question is in the scope of this forum. What do you say to your horse to attain it, what sound\word do you utter to get him going and to make him stop?

Thanks
 
  • Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    Whoooaaa is the same here, but how do you get your horse going besides poking its side or spurring it?
     

    Egoexpress

    Senior Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    Attaining a horse to me means that you use different things to have the horse do what you want him to do. I might be wrong :)
    Edit: I think I know where you're getting at, attaining a horse can mean that you use force for instance a whip to get him going, nah I'm not talking about that.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Perhaps you mean "training" instead of "attaining"? In any case, in the U.S.A. we say "gee!" to have a harnessed horse go left, and "haw!" for right. (I may have the directions reversed.) To make a horse come to you, a gentle clucking sound is all I've ever used.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In normal AE use, attain means reach or achieve. It is not, so far as I know, used in
    equine commands. I was just yanking your chain (reins? :) )

    Let's wait for someone more expert to tell us if there are "standard" commands to get a horse moving. I care for my neighbor's horse, and when I want him to start moving, I just say, "Let's go, Red" and he goes. I am not trained in the art of horsey imperatives,
    so this may run counter to what the horsey set prescribes. It works well. So does "Come on" pronounced more or less as 'cumawn!".

    Sometimes I speak to that horse in Spanish, and he seems to get the intention from my tone of voice, rather than a specific word.
     

    kittigger

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I hear they say something like "yeehawwwwww" (not sure about the spelling but that is at least how I hear them say) - Is it?
     

    kittigger

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hee, I heard that in a cowgirl movie (by Penelop Cruz and Salma Hake so so being bank robbers) At the end of the movie, one of them shouted yeehaw when riding her horse and the horse did run faster, hehe. So i think that it would come in handy when riding horses - YEAHAWWWWWWWWW
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I took some dressage lessons years ago (I look great in jodhpurs), and we did not use any voice commands, just the halter and our heels (no spurs, dressage is not a very macho form of riding).

    I know someone who raises racing ponies and I'll query her on this point.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    To call a horse, I make a clicking sound with my mouth/tonge.

    To get a horse going, I'll either do the same clicking sound or simply use a light kicking gesture with the heels. Maybe I'll also say "Come on!" or "Let's go." "Giddyup" is definitely used here in the south but not by me personally.

    To have a horse stop, I say "whoooaaaa," starting at mid-range intonation and falling down evenly.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To make the horse move forward, "Giddup!" or "giddyup!" (The Lone Ranger said "Heigh-o Silver. Away!")
    Equestrian activities are like some other activities, i.e. aviation, shooting, etc. in which the language used by participants is not that used by the general public.

    I've owned horses and participated in trail rides, pack trips, field trailing for dogs and some other things and never heard anybody seriously say "giddyup," although the term was common in motion pictures of the old West genre.

    The way in which one gets a horse moving varies as to whether is driving a buggy or sitting astride.

    All I've ever seen carriage drivers do is shake the reins and perhaps add a clucking sound. See, for example, this photo I took last week in the historic Belgian town of Bruges (Brugge).

    When riding astride, I can only speak for the American "Western" style of horseback riding, but all I've ever done is nudge the horse with my heel and spoken words are superfluous. (As Packard suggests) (This includes launching the horse out of the "chute" when chasing a calf with the intent of dropping a rope loop around its neck - but I'm too old for that stuff any more)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Well it's obviously going to depend on whether the horse is yours or not and if so, whether you trained it with certain sounds, and if not, whether the owner trained it with certain sounds and if you know them or not.

    In other words, a horse, like most animals, can be trained to understand vocal commands (usually in combination with physical commands like heel kicks), so that when you say, "Whoooaaa" (or whatever) it knows to slow down/stop.

    If you didn't train your horse with sounds, then of course no sounds will be effective. Similarly, if you ride someone else's horse who wasn't trained with sounds, then yours will be ineffective, or if he is trained but you use the wrong sounds, then they will be ineffective.

    All I can say for my personal experience is that clicking is used to get the attention* of a horse (and perhaps to make him go) and "whooaaa" is used to make him slow down or stop. Moreover, I've gotta represent the south here by saying that "giddyup" is still used by the older folks 'round here, usually followed by the name of the horse. :)

    *When I first read "attain a horse," I thought you meant "to get the attention of a horse." In this context, "attention" is fine, but "attain" as a verb is not, even though they are related words.
     
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